National Investment Trust Ltd (NITL.mu) HY2017 Interim Report

first_imgNational Investment Trust Ltd (NITL.mu) listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius under the Investment sector has released it’s 2017 interim results for the half year.For more information about National Investment Trust Ltd (NITL.mu) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the National Investment Trust Ltd (NITL.mu) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: National Investment Trust Ltd (NITL.mu)  2017 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileNational Investment Trust Limited is a privately owned investment trust company that provides services for individuals and corporate investors. The company engages in the launching and management of equity and fixed income mutual funds for its clients. NITL invests in equity and fixed income markets. National Investment Trust Limited is listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritiuslast_img read more

Rory Kockott ready for the Top 14 Final

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Toulon may have won the Heineken Cup but this South African scrum-half wants Castres to have the last laugh in the Top 14 final on Saturday. There’s also been a fair bit of pressure on Kockott off the field after he signed a pre-contract deal with Toulon in October, only to remain loyal to Castres, a change of heart that allegedly cost the club in the region of €300,000. Asked about the affair, Kockott says: “I’m happy with the decision I’ve made. I needed to stand back and get a perspective on what I wanted, but I know what is important in my life.”Less happy were the Toulon fans, who barracked Kockott when he appeared for Castres at the Stade Mayol in the same month he turned his back on the Cote d’Azur club. He laughs when reminded about the jeers. “That’s sport! It’s like the days of the gladiators when they gave you the thumbs up or the thumbs down. But I don’t get involved in all that.”The Toulon faithful – an estimated 20,000 will be in Paris on Saturday night – will probably target Kockott again, but that’s as much to do with his influence in the Castres side as any lingering resentment over the transfer saga. The fans aren’t alone in appreciating the danger Kockott poses to Toulon’s chances of doing the double. “The job’s not done,” warned Bakkies Botha a few hours after crushing Saracens. “Rory Kockott, he’s already in bed. I fear a lot this player. When I left South Africa he was an average scrum-half. After a few months at Castres he’s become a master.”All wrapped up: but will Castres be able to contain Wilkinson on Saturday?Kockott has the same mental strength as Jonny Wilkinson, a player the South African salutes as “massive…someone who has a profile like no one else in the game”All the talk going into Saturday’s final will be about Wilkinson as the Toulon fly-half prepares to bring down the curtain on his wonderful career. That’s fine by Kockott. This time last year no one gave Castres a hope against Toulon and they triumphed 19-14. Can history repeat itself? Kockott carries a quiet confidence that suggests it can. [email protected] must play for the Springboks before France snap him up. http://t.co/uuw9n85bde pic.twitter.com/oJqZXdXUwW— SA Rugby magazine (@SARugbymag) May 19, 2014 He holds a similar view on Toulon. Castres face the European champions on Saturday night in the final of the Top 14 and while Kockott will treat Toulon with respect he’ll run out on to the Stade de France without fear. “There’s no doubt we go in as underdogs,” agrees the 27-year-old, whose brilliant solo try at the end of the first-half in last year’s final gave Castres the self-belief to go on and beat Toulon. “They showed what a great side they are on Saturday (in beating Saracens) and have been impressive all season.”Second coming: Castres celebrate toppling Toulon in last year’s Top 14 finalCastres, on the other hand, have had the oddest of seasons. They lost three of their first five league matches and it took them until the end of November to record their first win on the road – a 20-16 victory in Montpellier. Their stuttering performances continued into 2014, interspersing eye-catching wins over Toulouse and Brive with sloppy displays against the likes of Stade Français, Biarritz and Bayonne. The defeat to Bayonne on the last weekend of the regular season condemned Castres to a quarter-final trip to Clermont. Adieu, we all assumed, but  Castres triumphed 22-16, inflicting on Clermont their first home defeat since November 2009 and ending their 76-match winning streak at the Stade Marcel-Michelin.Any quarter-final win is to be cherished, but Kockott says the fact they also ended the most formidable winning streak in professional rugby made it “special”. “Wins like that have a big psychological effect,” he explains. “You remember it, you take the experience of it and it makes you stronger as a squad.”It’s the cohesion of the Castres squad that makes them such a dangerous proposition. Having seen off Clermont, Castres went on to beat Montpellier in the semi-final and of their 23-man squad for that match only four hadn’t been at the club the previous season. “What it gives you is experience,” explains Kockott. “We share a common mindset. We’ve been there, experienced that and so in the pressure games we can figure out the ways and the means to win matches.”What makes Castres’ run to the final for a second successive season (a feat they last achieved in 1949 and 1950) all the more impressive is that they have a new coaching team this season. The two Laurents – Labit and Travers – departed last summer to racing Racing Métro and in came David Darricarrere and Serge Milhas. “It’s been great the way the squad has adapted,” reflects Kockott, who adds that he’s also tinkered with his own style this season. “Games have been tighter this season, there’s been more pressure on me and I’ve had to use my experience to do the right thing in certain situations.”center_img It’s a Kockott: the Castres scrum-half takes on Clermont’s Wesley Fofana Rory Kockott is a man who catches puff adders in his spare time. For the uninitiated, the venomous puff adder is arguably the fastest striking snake in the world, timed at .25 of a second, one reason why they are responsible for more snakebite fatalities in Africa than any other species. But whenever the Castres’ scrum-half pops home to the family farm in the Eastern Cape for a bit of R&R woe betide any puff adder that slithers too close. Kockott learned to catch snakes as a boy and he says that providing you never lose your respect for them it’s easier than one imagines. Watch out, Toulon, there could be a snake in the Stade de France grass.Watch Kockott in action below!last_img read more

15 of the most inspirational women in history

first_img 2 COMMENTS You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Mama Mia These are the most inspirational women in history; their achievements seeming all the more impressive given the modern world we now live in, where fashion, trends and politics can alter with a hashtag as quickly as a heartbeat, meaning finding timeless inspiration can sometimes seem like an impossible task. It’s why the following women deserve celebrating and why they are as relevant now as they ever were in the past.Throughout history, women have fought courageously and tirelessly to assert themselves as individuals and experts in their field, something most men have had the luxury of taking for granted.Groundbreaking designers, space explorers, pilots, political activists and feminists, artists, monarchs and leaders. There is something these inspirational women all share in common: they are all warriors and continue to inspire us in our own modern lives. Eleanor Roosevelt once challenged us all to, ‘do one thing every day that scares you.’ Below are just a select handful of headstrong women who echoed that call to arms and did just that.Meet the most inspirational women in history:CleopatraCleopatra‘I will not be triumphed over.’It seems strange and almost unfitting that a woman who came to define independent strength, determination and power in an age commanded by men should be named after the Greek for ‘glory of the father.’ By the time of her sudden death in 30 BC, glory would be entirely hers. Centuries later, Cleopatra still beguiles us. Much has been written about the Pharoah’s beauty: Roman consul Cassius Dio would speak of ‘a woman of surpassing beauty’. In actuality, her ‘beauty’ is the greatest myth that defines her legacy. It also undermines her real power. Far from the Hollywood visions of Elizabeth Taylor and Angelina Jolie we celebrate today, Cleopatra did not strike Antony and Caesar to their knees with her good looks, but rather with her wit, charm and intellect. Cleopatra’s beauty morphs with our changing fashions but her fierce dynamism never alters.Rosa ParksRosa Parks‘I would like to be remembered as a person who wanted to be free… so other people would be also free.’In her own humble words, ‘all I was doing was trying to get home from work.’ In actuality, she did infinitely more: she became an overnight figurehead for the civil rights movement in the US. On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks, a 42-year-old African-American seamstress refused to give up her seat to a white passenger on the Montgomery City bus. This isolated act and a single reply – ‘no, I’m not’ – ignited a boycott which continued for 381 days until the city repealed its law enforcing racial segregation on public buses. Rosa’s fearless rejection of racial segregation made her ‘the first lady of civil rights’. The day itself – the day she was arrested – will forever be known as Rosa Parks Day.Mary WollstonecraftMary Wollstonecraft‘If women be educated for dependence; that is, to act according to the will of another fallible being, and submit, right or wrong, to power, where are we to stop?’In 1792, Mary Wollstonecraft’s call for equality and her advocation of women’s rights struck 18th century society like a bolt of thunder splitting a tree in two. Thankfully we now live in an age where feminist thought is considered the norm – we have the likes of Caitlin Moran, Lena Dunham and Germaine Greer to applaud for that – but in the late 1700s, Wollstonecraft’s suggestion that men and women should be considered equal as rational beings was about as revolutionary as Joan of Arc galloping on horseback with her sword drawn. The publication of ‘A Vindication of the Rights of Woman’ in 1792 is considered one of the earliest examples of feminist philosophy. It didn’t take long for a backlash to occur and it wasn’t reprinted until the mid 19th century. A true revolutionary, Wollstonecraft’s spirit still endures.Nora EphronNora Ephron‘I try to write parts for women that are as complicated and interesting as women actually are.’Journalist, essayist, playwright, screenwriter, novelist, producer, director…she did it all. Nora Ephron battled gender inequality in an industry that still misrepresents women in front of the cameras and behind the scenes too. Hitting her stride as a journalist at the Post she soon made a name for herself as a Hollywood screenwriter responsible for, perhaps, the greatest romantic comedy of all-time: ‘When Harry Met Sally’. Not content with a screenwriting career, Nora’s candid books gave a uniquely witty, sharp and – at times – heartbreaking insight into her private life. Her 1983 autobiographical novel, ‘Heartburn’, depicts the breakdown of her marriage with refreshing honesty and killer one-liners. In a commencement address in 1996, to her old women’s liberal-arts college in Wellesley, she would famously say: ‘Above all, be the heroine of your life, not the victim.’Emmeline PankhurstEmmeline Pankhurst‘Trust in God – she will provide.’As synonymous with women’s suffrage as the word ‘suffrage’ itself, in 1999 Time magazine named Emmeline Pankhurst one of the 100 Most Important People of the 20th Century, saying: ‘she shaped an idea of women for our time; she shook society into a new pattern from which there could be no going back.’ In 1903 Pankhurst co-founded the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU) with a clear agenda focused on direct action to win women the vote. ‘Deeds not words, was to be our permanent motto’, she would later say. These words soon rang true. It was at Holloway Prison that Emmeline Pankhurst would stage her first hunger strike, withstanding violence and abuse to enable all women the right to vote.Josephine BakerJosephine Baker‘I wasn’t really naked. I simply didn’t have any clothes on.’Her moves were unmistakable: rhythmic hands, gyrating hips and elastic legs that propelled her round the dancefloor like a flurry of hypnotic windmill sails. New York’s ‘highest-paid chorus girl in vaudeville’ would truly make her name in deco Paris at ‘La Revue Nègre’ in the mid 1920s. Ultimate womaniser, Ernest Hemingway, called her ‘the most sensational woman anyone ever saw.’ Yet, despite her popularity and fame, Rosa Parks’ fight was hers too. When she arrived back in America in the 1950s she was refused reservations at 36 hotels. She took her battle to the cabaret clubs, refusing to perform to racially-segregated audiences (despite a $10,000 offer by a Miami club). Not even threatening calls from the Klu Klux Klan scared her. In 1963, she stood beside Martin Luther King at the March on Washington. She was the only official female speaker there.Malala YousafzaiMalala Yousafzai‘I don’t want to be remembered as the girl who was shot. I want to be remembered as the girl who stood up.’On October 9, 2012, a gunman boarded Malala’s school bus in Pakistan, asked her name and shot her three times in the head. Her crime? Speaking out about education for girls. Fear lost and bravery triumphed. A figurehead of our time, the shooting of Malala was a watershed moment, propelling a teenage girl into an overnight stateswoman for equal rights. In 2013, Time magazine listed Malala Yousafzai as one of ‘The 100 Most Influential People in the World’. On 10 October 2014, Malala co-received the Nobel Peace Prize. Lest we forget, she is still only 17 years old.Amelia EarhartAmelia Earhart‘Women must try to do things as men have tried. When they fail, their failure must be but a challenge to others.’Amelia Earhart gave women their wings, quite literally. The first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean in 1928, she was – incredibly – only the sixth woman to be issued a pilot’s license. In 1931, at the same time as setting a world altitude record of 18,415 feet, Earhart also joined ‘the Ninety-Nines’, an organization of female pilots who banded together to encourage women in aviation. She once described fears as ‘paper tigers’, adding, ‘please know that I am aware of the hazards. I want to do it because I want to do it.’ During an attempt to circumnavigate the globe in 1937, Earhart disappeared over the central Pacific Ocean. She was never found. Her final failure became, like she once said, a challenge to us all.Valentina TereshkovaValentina Tereshkova‘If women can be railroad workers in Russia, why can’t they fly in space?’In 1963, Valentina, a former textile worker from the Soviet Union became the first woman in space, orbiting the earth forty-eight times. She put the previous four American astronauts – all male – to shame with their combined total of thirty-six. Not only that, she logged more flight time than the total combined times of every American astronaut who had flown before her. She was only 26 years old. Right on, sister.Frida KahloFrida Kahlo‘Feet, what do I need you for when I have wings to fly?To understand Frida is to understand her pain. That doesn’t make her a victim of her own suffering – quite the contrary. The many outwood traumas that plagued her life – including a horrific bus accident leaving her crippled and unable to conceive – gave her the tools in which to paint her inner truth. Her husband Diego Rivera once talked about Frida’s art as ‘paintings that exalted the feminine qualities of endurance and truth, reality, cruelty, and suffering.’ He would go on to conclude: ‘Never before has a woman put such agonized poetry on canvas.’ ‘I paint my own reality’, Frida Kahlo once said. Her paintings are fearless because they paint the conflicting duality of female experience. In some respects, Frida’s art is both the rose petal and the thorn.Florence NightingaleFlorence Nightingale‘The very first requirement in a hospital is that it should do the sick no harm.‘Often regarded as ‘the lady with the lamp’, Florence Nightingale defied her parents to become a nurse. When the Crimean War broke out in 1853, Florence took 38 nurses to Turkey’s military hospital – the first time women had been allowed to do so. Her campaign to improve the quality of nursing in military hospitals led to Florence publishing a book called ‘Notes on Nursing’ in 1859, which is still in print today. Yet another female first was yet to come: Florence became the first female member of the Royal Statistical Society in 1858.Elizabeth TaylorElizabeth Taylor‘I’ve been through it all, baby, I’m mother courage.’Look up ‘survivor’ in the dictionary and you may well see Elizabeth Taylor glancing proudly up at you, under the weight of some dazzling diamonds, no doubt. Not only did she go through it all, she did so with a Balenciaga handbag crammed full of pithy one-liners to shut up her tabloid critics in the process.Coco ChanelCoco Chanel‘The most courageous act is still to think for yourself. Aloud.’Coco Chanel didn’t just challenge the gender norms of the time through her own personal life and career – her clothes set the female body free and redesigned it’s sillhouette. Men’s clothes became women’s too: breton tops, crewneck sweaters, trousers, flat heels and suits. Her own figure – boyish frame, cropped hair and tanned skin – fast became a fashionable rejection of the traditional feminine ideal. Not only that, her dresses flipped two fingers up to restrictive corsets. Vogue quickly dubbed her little black dress ‘the garçonne’ (little boy look).Marie CurieMarie Curie‘Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.’Marie Curie won two Nobel Peace Prizes – in 1903 and again in 1911 – but that doesn’t mean her male contemporaries gave her an easy time. To the contrary, she battled sexism throughout her entire career. ‘I have frequently been questioned, especially by women, of how I could reconcile family life with a scientific career,’ she once revealed. ‘Well, it has not been easy.’ Her critics never wore her down, however. Not only did Marie Curie’s research contribute to the development of x-rays in surgery, her tenacious spirit set her apart from her male peers. During World War she even helped equip ambulances with x-ray equipment, driving them herself to the front lines.Elizabeth IElizabeth I‘I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too.’She was the daughter of one of the most feared Kings to ever sit on the throne of England – and a Queen whose fierce intellect and courtly charms split the church in two. Elizabeth would become one of England’s longest serving monarchs (she ruled for 44 years) and would restore stability, defining her reign so effectively we now refer to it merely as ‘Elizabethan’. The best bit? She did so without a man by her side. Instead, Elizabeth declared she was married to her kingdom, referring to her subjects once in 1599 as ‘all my husbands, my good people’. Over the decades she would become as feared and revered as her father, Henry VIII, with Pope Sixtus V declaring: ‘She is only a woman, only mistress of half an island, and yet she makes herself feared by Spain, by France, by the Empire, by all’.Edith CavellEdith Cavell‘I realise that patriotism is not enough. I must have no hatred or bitterness towards anyone.’Found guilty of treason, sentenced to death and shot by a firing squad at the age of 49, Edith Cavell’s courage was heavily punished in her lifetime. The nurse used the Red Cross hospital she was working at to save the lives of soldiers from both sides of the First World War, without any discrimination, as well as smuggling over 200 Allied soldiers from Belgium, famously saying ‘I can’t stop while there are lives to be saved’. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your comment! Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Mama Mia Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom 16 of the most inspirational women in history and I have only heard of 9 of them. Didn’t know anything about Mary Wollstonecraft, Nora Ephron, Emmeline Pankhurst, Josephine Baker, Valentina Tereshkova, Freida Kahlor, or Edith Cavell. Knew of the rest of them……but I just don’t get inspired by the likes of the late Elizabeth Taylor, sorry……….. From Marie Claire We take a look at some of the most groundbreaking and inspirational women in history: from Cleopatra to Rosa Parks and Emmeline Pankhurst. Reply Read more here. TAGSInspiring womenMarie Claire Previous articleWe Are All Drunk on SomethingNext articleLake Apopka Natural Gas District celebrates Natural Gas Utility Workers’ Day Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR March 12, 2017 at 11:23 pm March 12, 2017 at 11:30 pm Women’s History Month Feature: Please enter your name here UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Reply Queen Elizabeth I….. sure had a long nose…..LOL! Just saying, hahahahaha…..!!! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replylast_img read more

History repeats itself as All Blacks Haka and Tongan Sipi Tau get set to face off

first_imgFriday Oct 9, 2015 History repeats itself as All Blacks Haka and Tongan Sipi Tau get set to face off The All Blacks and Tonga meet in today’s only game of the RWC, the last match for each side in the pool stages. While Tonga’s tournament is all but over, they will be sure to take it to their not too distant neighbours, particularly when it comes to the pre-match war dances.Tonight will be the third ever World Cup meeting between the two sides, as St James’ Park in Newcastle will be treated to a thrilling spectacle just before kickoff, when the two sides go head to head with the Haka and Sipi Tau respectively.Here is a quick look at the last two times they met, and how that went down.2003 Rugby World Cup At the 2003 tournament Tonga and New Zealand met in the pool stages at Suncorp Stadium, and what took place will forever be remembered as one of the most iconic moments of the showpiece event.As both sides lined up and Carlos Spencer led the All Blacks Haka, nobody realised that Tonga would respond with their Sipi Tau a few seconds later, creating a spectacular scene that had both sides going for it at the same time.Back then teams didn’t have to be separated by a certain amount of meters either, so the two sides got within spitting distance of one another, and history was made.2011 Rugby World Cup At the last World Cup in New Zealand, both sides met again in the opening match of the tournament. Everyone watched and wondered if the same scenes would be repeated, but on that occassion Tonga went first, with the All Blacks allowing them to finish before starting the Ka Mate.Again, it was another stirring renditon by both sides and a great way to start the tournament.Sipi Tau against the HakaTonga and New Zealand met on the opening night of #RWC2011 – four years on and they meet at St James’ Park in both of their final pool matches of #RWC2015We expect more fireworks #NZLvTGAPosted by Rugby World Cup on Friday, October 9, 20152015 Rugby World CupWe don’t know what will happen tonight, but due to the rules put in place by the IRB a few years back, both sides will no doubt stand on their 10m lines and go for it from there. Will we ever see a repeat of that famous moment back in 2003?“I think for the island nations because it’s a war dance you pretty much expect to do it at the same time,” says Tonga’s Siale Piutau. “It’s a face-off. I think now when the All Blacks do it to nations that don’t have a haka, they accept it and take the challenge that way. “We were thinking they would do it at the same time (in 2011), but they stood there and accepted the Sipi Tau and so we stood there and accepted the challenge from the haka. It’s great drama.”The chances are it was a once off, but whatever happens, and whatever you think of pre-match wardances in general, it’s a unique part of the sport and one that continues to intrigue and entertain fans around the globe.In today’s edition of RWC Daily they take an insightful deeper look at the Tongan Sipi Tau, and then we get to see a classic try scored by Mils Muliaina for New Zealand in that match in 2003.ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error All Blacks , Rugby World Cup , Traditional wardances Related Articles 40 WEEKS AGO North vs South should be a permanent fixture… 40 WEEKS AGO Barrett could easily end up on All Blacks… 42 WEEKS AGO Future All Blacks? Here are the standout… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life Reports30+ Everyday Items with a Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

DonateBitcoin deal sees bitcoin donations offered to all 1.5m US charities

first_img Melanie May | 26 September 2017 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis DonateBitcoin deal sees bitcoin donations offered to all 1.5m US charities  170 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Bitcoin donation processing Financecenter_img Advertisement DonateBitcoin has partnered with MakeMyDonation and OrgHunter to enable all 1.5m charities in the U.S. to accept bitcoin donations.Through DonateBitcoin’s partnership with MakeMyDonation, a donation processor for tech startups, when a user makes a bitcoin donation, it is sent to MakeMyDonation through Stripe, with donations instantly converted into US dollars. MakeMyDonation then posts out a cheque containing the amount of the bitcoin donation minus a nominal fee. DonateBitcoin has also partnered with OrgHunter, which provides the database of 1.5 million charities.Both donors and charities can use DonateBitcoin, Donors can go onto the DonateBitcoin site and search for a charity they wish to donate to, then enter the amount they want to give in dollars, which the site converts into bitcoins. The minimum donation amount is the bitcoin equivalent of $10.Charities can also embed a ‘bitcoins accepted here’ button on their sites. Whenever a user presses this button, they are sent to a pre-filled form on DonateBitcoin, with donations sent out by check from MakeMyDonation every 30 days.  169 total views,  1 views today About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

Journalist serving sentence for libel transferred to national security ministry centre

first_imgNews News Organisation RSF_en News Reporters Without Borders is concerned about opposition journalist Eynulla Fatullayev’s transfer yesterday from Bayil prison to the national security ministry’s detention centre. His lawyer said Fatullayev was given no prior warning of the transfer, although he should have been. Furthermore, the ministry has brought new charges against him under article 214 of the criminal code, which outlaws inciting acts of terrorism. Neither Fatullayev nor his lawyer have so far been told how he is supposed to have violated this article. ————————————————————Two and a half years in prison for editor who “insulted” AzerbaijanisVoicing concern about the growing number of press freedom violations in Azerbaijan, Reporters Without Borders today called for the immediate release of Eynulla Fatullayev, the editor of the weekly Realny Azerbaijan and of the daily Gundelik Azerbaijan, who was just been jailedFatullayev was given a two-and-a-half year jail term by the Yasamal district court in Baku on 20 April for “defaming” and “insulting” Azerbaijanis in an article about the murder of Azeris in Khojali, a town in the Nagorno-Karabakh region. He was taken off to prison at the end of the court hearing.Fatullayev was already convicted of libel in 2002, when he was fined 10,000 euros. He used to be deputy editor of the Monitor, a weekly known for criticising President Ilham Aliev’s government. Its founder and editor, Elmar Huseynov, was murdered on 2 March 2005.Uzeir Jafarov, a journalist with Gundelik Azerbaijan, was attacked and beaten by two men as he was returning to his car after the 20 April court hearing. He said he recognised one of his assailants as someone who had attended the Fatullayev trial. June 4, 2021 Find out more to go further May 30, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalist serving sentence for libel transferred to national security ministry centre Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information center_img June 8, 2021 Find out more RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan AzerbaijanEurope – Central Asia News “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says April 9, 2021 Find out more AzerbaijanEurope – Central Asia Russian peacekeepers deny foreign reporters access to Nagorno-Karabakh Follow the news on Azerbaijanlast_img read more

Hospital horror hits the elderly

first_imgNo vaccines in Limerick yet Call for Government action as 81 patients wait for beds in UHL TAGSfeaturedhealthHealth Minister Leo VaradkarHSEINMOKieran O’Donnell TDMary Fogartyuniversity hospital limerick Advertisement Twitter Print Facebook Joint Easter message on Covid 19 from Limerick City and County Council, HSE, UL Hospitals and An Garda Síochána NewsHospital horror hits the elderlyBy John Keogh – June 11, 2015 775 WhatsAppcenter_img Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR  by Kathy [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up AN 81-year-old woman was left sitting on a commode for two hours in the emergency department at University Hospital Limerick (UHL) last week.The woman’s granddaughter, who asked not to be named, told the Limerick Post on Thursday that her grandmother was also waiting on a trolley for more than 24 hours.“She was put sitting on a commode for two hours, and now they have her in nappies because they don’t have the time to put her on a commode”, she explained.“The nurses are doing everything that they can in these conditions; it’s not their fault. It was a nurse who told me to ring the newspaper to try and do something about it.“There is a queue of ambulances waiting outside the hospital with patients in them. They can’t get the patients into the A&E because there’s nowhere to put them”, the woman added.Last Thursday, there were 11 ambulances waiting outside the emergency department in a queue to admit patients. At that time there were 27 patients already on trolleys and a further 16 waiting for beds in wards.On Friday, there were 24 patients on trolleys and 24 patients waiting in wards.Meanwhile, the family of a 101-year-old woman from Clare said she had to wait five hours for an ambulance on Thursday to take her to UHL, and then spent 25 hours on a trolley in the emergency department.Mary Fogarty, INMO representative for the Mid West said: “It’s absolutely deplorable, disgraceful and inhumane that any health service could leave a woman of that age, 101 years old, on a trolley. Words just can’t express it. We have repeatedly asked the HSE to prioritise patients in emergency departments for beds.”Limerick  Fine Gael TD Kieran O’Donnell called for an immediate review into the case and said he is to meet with Health Minister Leo Varadkar to address the issue.“The HSE has to make absolutely sure that this does not happen again,” he added.A spokesperson for the HSE said that the emergency department at UHL saw “an unexpected increase in patients presenting over the last week” which resulted in long delays and high numbers of patients waiting on trolleys.“During particularly busy times last Thursday, a number of ambulances experienced delays discharging patients to the care of the University Hospital Limerick, however every effort was made to free up ambulances as a priority.“UL Hospitals Group apologises that any patient has to wait to be admitted. Delivery of the best possible care for the patient is our priority from the moment of presentation. Staff across the Group are working very hard to ensure the optimum care and safety of all our patients during this exceptionally busy period,” added the spokesperson.She added that the older age profile of patients along with the complexity of issues that they have, was contributing to the increase in pressure in the emergency department.UL Hospitals Group enacted their escalation plan to deal with the increase, which includes transferring patients to Ennis, Nenagh and St John’s Hospital, conducting extra rounds and transferring suitable patents to community care. SCAM ALERT: HSE warn of bogus calls following cyber attack Linkedin Email Previous articleFish kill under investigationNext articleA guiding light in the darkness John Keoghhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Limerick Post Show | Careers & Health Sciences Event for TY Students last_img read more

Donegal to benefit from International Trail funding

first_imgAs well as improvements to the Donegal section of the trail, five Northern Ireland councils will be making improvements to their sections as part of works costing over £600,000. The widespread investment is the result of a collaborative effort by each area, working together to ensure the overall visitor experience is improved across the entire trail for both locals and tourists. By enhancing the visitor experience on the trail, the improvements will have the potential to attract more domestic and international visitors and therefore generate substantial economic benefit for the businesses along the route and the wider area.As part of the effort to attract more local, national and international visitors there is also significant investment being directed towards a project to promote the trail, worth almost £120,000. Marketing campaigns in Ireland and North America will be executed by Outdoor Recreation NI, an organisation with extensive experience in promoting walking trails to locals and tourists, towards the end of 2021.Pic-Pictured at the launch of the project work in Donegal are left-right: Cllr Niamh Kennedy, Donegal County Council, Steven Doherty, North West Forest Services, Inga Bock, Rural Recreation Officer and Frank Kelly, LEADER Rural Development Manager, DLDC The International Appalachian Trail is one of the largest trail networks in the world with route ‘chapters’ in a range of countries including the United States, Canada, Greenland, Iceland, throughout Europe and ending in the Anti-Atlas Mountains of Morocco. Paul Wylezol, Co-Chair of the International Appalachian Trail based in Canada said “The Ulster Ireland section will be an inspiring addition to the International Appalachian Trail story and the commencement of works on the Donegal section of the walking trail is a significant milestone”. He added “With shared geological and cultural storylines, combined with uniquely Irish attractions, the developed Ulster Ireland section has great potential to attract a wide variety of North American walkers, from eco, geo and adventure tourists to fans of the well-known Game of Thrones television series.”  A total funding package of €215K has been secured to carry out works on over 120 kilometres of walking trail in County Donegal as part of a cross border cooperation project.  The funding which includes a grant of €161K from LEADER, €50K in match funding from Donegal County Council, with other funding being provided by the Rural Recreation Programme, will set out to develop and enhance the International Appalachian Trail (IAT) in Donegal. Inga Bock Rural Recreation Officer and IAT Co-ordinator in Donegal commented “We started working to get the IAT to Ireland in 2009 and launched the route on the ground in 2013. I am delighted that we now have the funding to enhance the user experience on our section of this incredibly diverse international trail”. Homepage BannerNews Pinterest Improved trail waymarkingDedicated trailheads at key access pointsTrail information boardsAdditional trail infrastructure (e.g. stiles, fencing, seating, etc.)Path development works at Lough EskeTrail art/sculptures along the wayA Trail Maintenance and Monitoring App Twitter Funding has been secured to carry out works on a cross border walking route which is part of the International Appalachian Trail.A total funding package of €215,000 has been secured to carry out works on the Donegal section of the trail, with money coming from LEADER, Donegal County Council, and the Rural Recreation Programme.In total, €875,000 is being spent on the island. The full trail is approximately 485km in length, and runs from South West Donegal to Larne passing through six council areas.It starts at the Slieve League cliffs, passing through Glencolmcille and the Bluestack Mountains. It then crosses into Tyrone, picking up the Ulster Way, taking in the Sperrins, the stunning North Coast and the Glens of Antrim.Inga Bock, the IAT Co-ordinator in Donegal, says working to get the International Appalachian Trail to Ireland began in 2009, and the route was launched in 2013.***************************Release in full -Walking Trail in Donegal with Global Connections is Awarded€215K to Enhance Tourism Offering The overall section of the IAT in Ireland has secured funding of close to €875K for the entire route. The Trail is approximately 302miles/485km in length and runs from South West Donegal to Larne passing through six council areas. It starts at the spectacular Slieve League cliffs, passes through Glencolmcille, traverses the Bluestack Mountains in Co Donegal before crossing into Co. Tyrone. Here it picks up the Ulster Way, taking in the Sperrins, the stunning North Coast and the Glens of Antrim. Facebook Google+ Donegal to benefit from International Trail funding Google+ According to Frank Kelly LEADER Rural Development Manager “The project aims to connect Donegal to the Derry City and Strabane District as well as other local action groups (LAG’s) throughout Northern Ireland by improving a trail that will have both international and local appeal. This will help stimulate local economies by creating additional tourist amenities. It will also add value to the continuous work being carried out under the Rural Recreation Programme and the Walks Scheme in Donegal”. In Donegal, the trail runs from Slieve League, via Malin Beg, Glencolmcille, Port, Ardara, Glenties, Disert, Lough Eske, Clar and Leghowney to the border at Kelly’s Bridge. Work on the project has begun and includes WhatsApp Facebook Twitter News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Pinterest Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme WhatsApp By News Highland – November 3, 2020 DL Debate – 24/05/21 Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Previous articleDerry security alert endsNext articleInterTrade Ireland very concerned at Brexit impact News Highland Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

Confederate monuments will stay in place at NC capitol after new vote

first_imgSara D. Davis/Getty Images(CHAPEL HILL, N.C.) — The students of the University of North Carolina may have torn down a Confederate statue from their campus, but a new vote by a state commission means that three other confederate statues will stay put at the state capitol.A commission voted Wednesday that three Confederate statues that currently stand at the state capitol in Raleigh are going to remain in place but have signage with more context added, along with the addition of one or more statues honoring African Americans.The Confederate Monuments Study Committee voted on their resolutions this morning, becoming the latest state to grapple with the remnants of the confederacy.North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper asked for the three monuments — the monument to the Confederate Dead of North Carolina, to Henry Lawson Wyatt who was the first Confederate soldier killed during the Civil War, and to the North Carolina Women of the Confederacy — to be removed from the capitol and moved to a Civil War battlefield, but the commission Wednesday said such a move cannot happen.The commission resolved that because of a state law that was put in place in 2015 barring the removal of such statues, they were “unable to recommend the removal or relocation of the three Confederate monuments because removal or relocation is not required to preserve these three monuments.”The law was put in place in late July 2015, about two weeks after the confederate flag was removed from the South Carolina state capitol in the wake of the Charleston church shooting.The stipulations made in that 2015 law that would allow for the removal of a Confederate monument include the protection of the monument or if it were moved to a place of equal prominence.Michele Walker, a spokesperson for the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, said that the commission did not feel that the current state of the statues met those conditions.“The commisison’s decision essentially was that the 2015 law really does not give them the flexibility to move those monuments,” Walker said.The vote came two days after about 250 protestors gathered around the “Silent Sam” monument at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and toppled the statue.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Press release: Measles and summer travel to Europe

first_img In the early 2000s there was a fall in MMR vaccination coverage in children and as a consequence, we are now seeing measles cases in young adults. Measles can be more serious in adults with a higher likelihood of hospitalisation and complications arising. Measles is circulating in England and the rest of Europe. We often think about what travel-related vaccines we might need before going on holiday, but it’s also important to check that we are up to date with routine vaccinations like MMR. If you are unsure if you have had 2 doses of MMR call your GP practice to check and catch up if needed. Young people are encouraged to make sure they have had both doses of the MMR vaccine before going on holiday to Europe where there are large outbreaks of measles.Cases of measles also continue to rise across England in unvaccinated people of this age.The vaccine is available free to anyone who has not received both doses as a child. It protects against measles, mumps and rubella, all of which can be very serious diseases and are highly infectious.While vaccine uptake levels in the UK in young children are currently very high, coverage levels dipped to a low of 80% in 2003. This means that there are significant numbers of unprotected teenagers and young adults who could catch measles both in England, particularly in environments of close mixing such as summer festivals and when they travel abroad for the summer holidays.Measles is a highly infectious viral illness that can sometimes lead to serious complications and can be fatal in very rare cases so getting protected by taking up the offer of vaccination is crucial.Between 1 January 2018 and 2 July 2018 there have been 738 laboratory confirmed measles cases in England. Cases were reported in most areas with London (262), the South-East (154), South-West (109), West Midlands (84) and Yorkshire and Humberside (76) reporting the most cases (based on provisional figures).The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that to prevent outbreaks of disease, 95% of people need to have received the MMR vaccine.Dr Mary Ramsay, Head of Immunisation at Public Health England (PHE), said: Parents are also urged to take up the offer of MMR vaccination for their children at 1 year old and as a pre-school booster at 3 years and 4 months old.last_img read more