Shuttle Bus Driver x 4

first_imgPosting Details Job #036712 Job TypeFull-time Syracuse University has a long history of engaging veterans and themilitary-connected community through its educational programs,community outreach, and employment programs. After World War II,Syracuse University welcomed more than 10,000 returning veterans toour campus, and those veterans literally transformed SyracuseUniversity into the national research institution it is today. TheUniversity’s contemporary commitment to veterans builds on thishistorical legacy, and extends to both class-leading initiativesfocused on making an SU degree accessible and affordable to thepost-9/11 generation of veterans, and also programs designed toposition Syracuse University as the employer of choice for militaryveterans, members of the Guard and Reserve, and military familymembers. CampusSyracuse, NY Tools/Equipment Job TitleShuttle Bus Driver x 4 Staff Level00 Commitment to Supporting and Hiring Veterans Unionized Position CodeUT LocationSyracuse, NY Job Description Syracuse University is an equal-opportunity, affirmative-actioninstitution. The University prohibits discrimination and harassmentbased on race, color, creed, religion, sex, gender, nationalorigin, citizenship, ethnicity, marital status, age, disability,sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression, veteranstatus, or any other status protected by applicable law to theextent prohibited by law. This nondiscrimination policy coversadmissions, employment, and access to and treatment in Universityprograms, services, and activities. Job CategoryUnion/Bargaining Unit About Syracuse University Job Specific Qualifications Syracuse University is actively hiring shuttle bus drivers to fillseveral full time and part time positions. Shifts vary and mayinclude daytime, evening, overnight and weekend requirements.Syracuse University is looking for safe, friendly drivers to helppassengers move throughout the Syracuse University campus. Driversmust possess valid CDL with applicable certifications andendorsement. Syracuse University is a private, international research universitywith distinctive academics, diversely unique offerings and anundeniable spirit. Located in the geographic heart of New YorkState, with a global footprint, and nearly 150 years of history,Syracuse University offers a quintessential collegeexperience.The scope of Syracuse University is a testament to its strengths: apioneering history dating back to 1870; a choice of more than 200majors and 100 minors offered through 13 schools and colleges;nearly 15,000 undergraduates and 5,000 graduate students; more thana quarter of a million alumni in 160 countries; and a studentpopulation from all 50 U.S. states and 123 countries. For moreinformation, please visit www.syracuse.edu. Job Posting Date10/23/2020 Hours may vary based on operational needs. Message to Applicants Responsibilities In addition to completing an online application, please attach aresume and cover letter. FLSA StatusNon-exempt Physical Requirements Quick Linkhttps://www.sujobopps.com/postings/85249 DepartmentParking & Transit Services Department Code35006-7100 Pay RangeCommensurate with Experience About the Syracuse area Application Instructions Qualifications Commitment to a Diverse and Inclusive Campus Community Possess and able to maintain a valid Commercial Driver’s License (CDL ) A or B in good standing with appropriate endorsements.Must meet 19-A qualifications.Must submit and pass a physical examination or possess a DOTMedical Examiner’s Certificate.Have at least 3 years of driving experience.Employment is contingent upon successful completion of a thoroughbackground check, which includes employment history, and a criminalrecords check.Pre-employment and continued random drug screening will berequired. Physical Requirements Include Ability to:Sit for extended periods of timeLift, push, pull, and carry tools, objects, or equipment aboveshoulder level without assistanceMove up and down stairs easilyReach overhead and below the knees, including bending, twisting,pulling, and stooping Full Consideration By Syracuse University maintains an inclusive learning environment inwhich students, faculty, administrators, staff, curriculum, socialactivities, governance, and all other aspects of campus lifereflect a diverse, multi-cultural, and international worldview. TheUniversity community recognizes and values the many similaritiesand differences among individuals and groups. At Syracuse, we arecommitted to preparing students to understand, live among,appreciate, and work in an inherently diverse country and worldmade up of people with different ethnic and racial backgrounds,military backgrounds, religious beliefs, socio-economic status,cultural traditions, abilities, sexual orientations and genderidentities. To do so, we commit ourselves to promoting a communitythat celebrates and models the principles of diversity andinclusivity. EEOC Hours Application Deadline Syracuse is a medium-sized city situated in the geographic centerof New York State approximately 250 miles northwest of New YorkCity. The metro-area population totals approximately 500,000. Thearea offers a low cost of living and provides many social,cultural, and recreational options, including parks, museums,festivals, professional regional theater, and premier shoppingvenues. Syracuse and Central New York present a wide range ofseasonal recreation and attractions ranging from water skiing andsnow skiing, hiking in the Adirondacks, touring the historic sites,visiting wineries along the Finger Lakes, and biking on trailsalong the Erie Canal. Drive and operate a shuttle, bus, or van to transport passengersaround campus and throughout the City of Syracuse in a safe andcourteous manner.Operating vehicle while adhering to University policies andprocedures.Conduct vehicle inspections as required by department policy andDOT regulations.Operate vehicle communication systems within guidelines ofUniversity policies.Clean and fuel shuttle, bus, or van as part of daily duties, and asdirected by supervisor.Maintain scheduled route to established time and mileage.Immediately notify supervisor of changes/delays.Record and report incidents/problems through appropriate proceduresestablished by the department, including accidents and mechanicalconcerns.Provide information to students, faculty, and staff membersregarding the shuttle service program.Attend all required University, federal and state regulatoryin-service training and meetings.Maintain CDL, all applicable certifications and endorsements(includes regular physicals, recertification training andexaminations). Have excellent customer and communication skills.Be able to utilize two-way radio communications.Have basic computer skills.Schedule flexibility and ability to work various events duringevenings, weekends and holidays.Must complete recertification requirements in a timelymanner.Comply with all applicable federal and state regulations regardingoperation of commercial vehicles.last_img read more

Rep. Messer Works to Help Veterans Harmed by ITT Tech Shut Down, Other…

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Messer’s bill, H.R. 1216, has garnered support from veterans groups, including the American Legion, Student Veterans of America and Veterans Education Success.“Veterans who attended failed institutions have had their GI Bill taken away from them through no fault of their own,” National Commander of the American Legion Charles Schmidt said in his letter of support. “They deserve more from us, and it is critical that we provide protections for the full benefits they earned while serving America honorably.”“For student veterans who experienced the hardship of being left with no degree of value, lost GI Bill benefits, and a poor prospect for future employment, something must be done,” President and CEO of Student Veterans of America Jared Lyon said in his letter of support.  “We are very pleased that Rep. Messer has taken up the charge of this challenge.”“[This] bill is very important in establishing a practical means to ensure veterans can successfully complete their program of study and realize their full potential, following service in our Armed Forces,” said President of Veterans Education Success Carrie Wofford, in her letter of support. “A grateful nation owes them no less.”Messer previously led the charge to restore Pell Grant eligibility to students who were using the grants to attend ITT Technical Institute. At Messer’s urging, the Department of Education agreed to restore Pell Grants to an estimated 16,000 former ITT Tech students enabling them to finish their degrees elsewhere.Hoosier veterans can share their stories with Rep. Messer’s Office by calling 202-225-3021. “I’m looking at not having the benefits I thought I would have when I started my college journey. I’m worried about how I will afford it, especially after just getting married and with hopes of starting a family. A majority of people I went to school with at ITT were veterans, and I’m sure they’re all hurting pretty bad.”Shelby from Washington State, served in the Army National Guard and served tours in Iraq, Kuwait and Afghanistan Rep. Messer Works to Help Veterans Harmedby ITT Tech Shut Down, Other School ClosuresStudent Vets Share Their StoriesWASHINGTON (Thursday, March 2, 2017) — Rep. Luke Messer (IN-06) is working to restore GI Bill educational benefits to veterans harmed by school closures, like the recent closure of Indiana-based ITT Technical Institute.ITT Tech closed its doors in September of 2016, impacting 130 campuses nationwide and an estimated 40,000 students, including more than 7,000 veterans. While many students have been able to discharge loans in the wake of ITT Tech’s closure, veterans have not received any relief or reinstatement of their earned GI Bill benefits.Messer reintroduced his bill, Protecting Veterans from School Closures Act, to allow veterans to recover their GI Bill educational benefits if they used their benefits to attend a college or university that closes, like ITT Tech.“Our veterans count on their GI Bill education benefits to earn a degree and find a good job after serving our country,” Messer said. “Through no fault of their own, veteran students at ITT Tech lost this opportunity. These vets deserve our support and a path forward to complete their education.”Many veterans impacted by ITT Tech’s closure have struggled with transferring credits and, in some cases, have been forced to start their education over. Several veterans across the country shared their stories with Messer’s office.“Before ITT Tech closed, I was on track to graduate this June with a project management degree. I transferred to DeVry but it set me back, and now my GI Bill benefits will expire before I can get a degree. Without my benefits that enable me to attend school while supporting my wife and four kids, I’ll have to drop out.”Kevin from Arizona, served from 1990-2010 in the U.S. Navy “I’m looking at not having the benefits I thought I would have when I started my college journey. I’m worried about how I will afford it, especially after just getting married and with hopes of starting a family. A majority of people I went to school with at ITT were veterans, and I’m sure they’re all hurting pretty bad.”Shelby from Washington State, served in the Army National Guard and served tours in Iraq, Kuwait and Afghanistan “I’ve had to completely start my education over at Phoenix University. None of my credits transferred. This has been a waste of money and has been very frustrating.”Daniel from Nevada, served in the U.S. Army and served two tours in Afghanistan “I’ve had to completely start my education over at Phoenix University. None of my credits transferred. This has been a waste of money and has been very frustrating.”Daniel from Nevada, served in the U.S. Army and served two tours in Afghanistan Messer’s bill, H.R. 1216, has garnered support from veterans groups, including the American Legion, Student Veterans of America and Veterans Education Success.“Veterans who attended failed institutions have had their GI Bill taken away from them through no fault of their own,” National Commander of the American Legion Charles Schmidt said in his letter of support. “They deserve more from us, and it is critical that we provide protections for the full benefits they earned while serving America honorably.”“For student veterans who experienced the hardship of being left with no degree of value, lost GI Bill benefits, and a poor prospect for future employment, something must be done,” President and CEO of Student Veterans of America Jared Lyon said in his letter of support.  “We are very pleased that Rep. Messer has taken up the charge of this challenge.”“[This] bill is very important in establishing a practical means to ensure veterans can successfully complete their program of study and realize their full potential, following service in our Armed Forces,” said President of Veterans Education Success Carrie Wofford, in her letter of support. “A grateful nation owes them no less.”Messer previously led the charge to restore Pell Grant eligibility to students who were using the grants to attend ITT Technical Institute. At Messer’s urging, the Department of Education agreed to restore Pell Grants to an estimated 16,000 former ITT Tech students enabling them to finish their degrees elsewhere.Hoosier veterans can share their stories with Rep. Messer’s Office by calling 202-225-3021. Student Vets Share Their StoriesWASHINGTON (Thursday, March 2, 2017) — Rep. Luke Messer (IN-06) is working to restore GI Bill educational benefits to veterans harmed by school closures, like the recent closure of Indiana-based ITT Technical Institute.ITT Tech closed its doors in September of 2016, impacting 130 campuses nationwide and an estimated 40,000 students, including more than 7,000 veterans. While many students have been able to discharge loans in the wake of ITT Tech’s closure, veterans have not received any relief or reinstatement of their earned GI Bill benefits.Messer reintroduced his bill, Protecting Veterans from School Closures Act, to allow veterans to recover their GI Bill educational benefits if they used their benefits to attend a college or university that closes, like ITT Tech.“Our veterans count on their GI Bill education benefits to earn a degree and find a good job after serving our country,” Messer said. “Through no fault of their own, veteran students at ITT Tech lost this opportunity. These vets deserve our support and a path forward to complete their education.”Many veterans impacted by ITT Tech’s closure have struggled with transferring credits and, in some cases, have been forced to start their education over. Several veterans across the country shared their stories with Messer’s office.“Before ITT Tech closed, I was on track to graduate this June with a project management degree. I transferred to DeVry but it set me back, and now my GI Bill benefits will expire before I can get a degree. Without my benefits that enable me to attend school while supporting my wife and four kids, I’ll have to drop out.”Kevin from Arizona, served from 1990-2010 in the U.S. Navylast_img read more

Governor Holcomb’s First State Of The State Address Focused On Advancing Indiana’s long-Term Position…

first_imgINDIANAPOLIS – Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb on Tuesday delivered his 2017 State of the State address to a joint convention of the Indiana General Assembly. His remarks elaborated on the five pillars of his legislative agenda while introducing new key issues.Full text of Governor Eric J. Holcomb’s 2017 State of the State address is attached.“Together, we have the special charge of leading Indiana into our third century,” Governor Holcomb said. “That means we need to think not just about today but about the years to come—and we need to act with boldness and courage to solve our current issues and prepare Indiana for the ever-changing future.”Governor Holcomb outlined his Next Level Legislative Agenda for the 2017 session on Jan. 5, just days before his inauguration. The agenda presents five pillars designed to address the key challenges facing our state today while positioning Indiana for long-term success and economic growth:Cultivate a strong and diverse economy to ensure Indiana is a magnet for jobs.Fund a long-term roads and bridges plan.Develop a 21stcentury skilled and ready workforce.Attack the drug epidemic.Provide great government service.Regarding how to fund a long-term plan for infrastructure, the Governor reiterated his support for a range of options—including fuel tax increases, new tolling options, fees for alternative-fuel vehicles and creative public-private partnerships.“The fact is, existing sources of revenue are just not keeping up,” Governor Holcomb said. “I’m a believer that every time you ask a taxpayer for a dollar, you better be darn sure you need it and are going to use it effectively for its intended purpose. And, here’s a case that if we ask Hoosiers to invest a little more to meet the need, the return is going to be well worth it—for them, for our communities, and for our economy.”The Governor also focused on attacking Indiana’s drug epidemic. Since 2000, the number of Hoosier deaths caused by drug overdoses has increased by 500 percent, and Indiana ranks 15th nationally in overdose fatalities. In his address, Governor Holcomb called out the “heroes on the front lines” in Indiana communities working to curb the drug crisis and save lives every day. On day one in office, Governor Holcomb created a new position charged with the responsibility to coordinate and oversee the state’s efforts to curb the drug epidemic: an executive director for drug prevention, treatment and enforcement.Beyond his five legislative priorities, the Governor maintained his support for a fourth water port in Southern Indiana to accelerate economic development as well as for amending the Indiana Constitution to ensure the state passes balanced biennial budgets for generations to come. He said his administration would focus on a long-term plan for bringing clean coal technology and innovation to the state.Governor Holcomb ended his first State of the State address with a commitment to working with people from all walks of life.“I will continue to reach out to everyone with ideas that can lift all Hoosiers, including those who may not always agree on everything but are willing to find opportunities to solve problems and move our state forward,” Governor Holcomb said.Each year, Indiana’s Governor addresses both houses of the state legislature, the state’s Supreme Court Justices, and other state leaders at the beginning of the legislative session in the State of the State Address. It provides an opportunity for the Governor to report on the status quo of the state’s affairs, highlight key accomplishments of the past year, and outline key priorities for the year ahead. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

PIECRAFT PERFECTION

first_imgMelton Mowbray – the battleground for the ongoing spat between industry giants Northern Foods and a handful of Melton Mowbray pork pie producers over the pie’s protected status – is a small town where pork pies and tourism are big businesses. In the Melton Mowbray area alone, tourism employs over 1,100 people and is worth over £55 million. It’s little surprise the local pie makers are so keen to protect their slice of the takings.“We don’t charge for demonstrations,” says Stephen Hallam, managing director of Melton Mowbray pork pie specialist Dickinson & Morris (D&M), which gives regular showcases of the traditional pie-making method in its historical shop. “But if we do our job well, if the theatre is right – and successful retailing needs theatre – then every passenger on every coach will buy a pork pie.” Vegetarians and Jewish or Muslim tourists give the town a wide berth, presumably.The elusive tiny minority of UK households that, Hallam says, does not buy pork pies at Christmas may be tough to convert. A better bet is the populace that shuns the seasonal favourite apart from Christmas. Around 95% of households buy a pork pie at Christmas, he claims, yet only 55% buy them during the year. So D&M’s range was recently expanded to include a bite-sized six-pack and twin pack to capitalise on the lunchtime trade. This is aimed at changing the perception of pork pies from a one-off Christmas treat.Playing the tourism cardThe D&M brand, produced in a bakery outside Leicester, services retailers including Tesco and Sainsbury’s. But D&M’s brand capital comes from its historical Ye Olde Pork Pie Shoppe in Melton Mowbray, which plays the tourism card to great success. By promoting itself to coach companies and group travel operators, busloads of tourists pour into the small shop, which struggles to keep up with the demand for hand-raised pies. Cashing weekly sales of £320 per square metre, with annual pork pie sales of over £400,000, it is a tactic that is clearly paying off. Barely a week now passes without a visit from a film crew, or the telephone ringing for a comment or an interview, says Hallam. But it isn’t just about selling a pie; he says it’s up to bakers to educate and enthuse the public, to share their heritage through group demos, talking to consumers and letting them taste the product. Changing attitudes to foodOver previous decades the reputation of the pork pie has diminished as manufacturers cut corners to meet price points, he believes. Consumers noticed and grew sceptical of the product. But, he says, our attitude towards food is slowly changing and provenance, trust values and regionality are gaining in importance.“There is a great interest in regional foods sweeping the country – at last we’re waking up, and we have some great British products,” he says. “There is a tradition in Leicestershire of always having a slice of pork pie for breakfast at Christmas, which harks back to medieval times when the pie was the equivalent of today’s turkey. We’re keeping alive that tradition. We see a 500% uplift of pork pie sales at Christmas. But there’s another 51 weeks that we could sell customers a pie.”Melton Mowbray – the spiritual home of the pork pie – is a small medieval market town in northeast Leicestershire with a population of just 30,000. It has six multiple retailers: Tesco, Morrisons, Co-op, Iceland, Kwik Save and Marks & Spencer; eight bakers including Greggs, Bakers Oven and Coombs; six butchers; and within a 10-mile radius, many other retailers selling Melton Mowbray pork pies.Pork pie historyStephen Hallam explains the history: “Going back 200 years Stilton Cheese was made in and around Melton Mowbray and cheese makers found the by-product, whey, to be a good food supplement to feed pigs. This led to a surplus of pork. So the local grocer got together with the local baker, Edward Adcock, and started making pies.”Though not the originator of the pie, Ye Olde Pork Pie Shoppe has been around for more than four centuries and is the oldest pie shop in the town. John Dickinson rented the property in 1851 and Joseph Morris joined the business in 1886; 15 years later, the firm changed its name to the now familiar Dickinson & Morris.Fire devastated the building in August 1991 and, in March 1992, the business was acquired by Samworth Brothers. The Grade Two listed building took seven months of extensive reconstruction and sympathetic refurbishment and the shop and bakery reopened in October 1992. Of the 4,500 footfall per week, 30% are visitors – which means that 70% are not and they have the opportunity to shop elsewhere in a very crowded marketplace. D&M began supplying the retailers in 1996.“For years, we agonised over price parity for our pork pie with our competitors in the town,” says Hallam. “We’ve now bitten the bullet and actually raised our prices, which has added further credibility to our presence. Point of difference“Within half a mile, Tesco, Morrisons and the Co-op are all selling the D&M pork pie at a cheaper price, with no parking charges nor inconvenience of purchases being carried around the town. So consumers will pay for our point of difference.”Two years ago, Greggs, which already had a presence in the town with Bakers Oven, opened next door, which hit its sausage roll trade by 20%. “Not only has this now come back, but sales have increased by 20%,” he says. “We took a positive response to Greggs’ presence, introducing a real Cornish pasty at a premium price – made in Cornwall but baked by us in Melton Mowbray – and we reintroduced a totally hand-raised pork pie, also at a premium price. “Greggs’ products meet the needs of a particular market very well, but I think our products deserve the premium that our customers pay – and they seem to agree.”PGI statusEight years ago D&M, together with a group of six other manufacturers formed the Melton Mowbray Pork Pie Association (MMPPA) with the purpose of gaining Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) status to restrict production of the pies to a 1,800sq mile zone around Melton Mowbray. PGI is one of the three European designations to protect regional products that have a specific quality, reputation or other characteristics attributable to the area in question. It acts in the same way that an ‘appellation contrôlée’ does for wine.Backed by the Department of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, the MMPPA fought off a legal challenge in the High Court in 2005 from Northern Foods, which has a £50m-strong share of the Melton Mowbray pork pie market, but produces out of factories in Shropshire and Wiltshire. Earlier this year, the Court of Appeal ruled in favour of the MMPPA, rejecting Northern Foods’ case. The case is now being pursued in the European courts.“It’s all about protecting the integrity of the Melton Mowbray Pork Pie and defending its reputation, about protecting the consumer from being misled about the provenance and quality of proper Melton Mowbray Pork Pies,” Hallam told the British Society of Bakers Spring Conference this year. “Although comment has been made that the floodgates are about to open with silly applications – Yorkshire Puddings, for example – in reality this won’t happen, as each application is judged on its own merit. I do hope the association’s stand against Northern Foods will make it easier for good manufacturers to charge the right price for their products.”In a new twist, Northern Foods has put its chilled division up for sale, which includes its two Melton Mowbray pork pie plants, but will progress the case until a new owner is found, who will then decide whether to continue the action.Hand-raising a pork pie – the demonstrationDistinctive styleUsing a hot water paste and pork fat with a little salt and pepper, the Melton Mowbray pork pie’s pastry is quite distinctive. Lard brings richness while the hot water paste gives it its crunchiness. Drawing an unlikely comparison between a lard-based pie and a luxury car, Stephen Hallam says: “If you were to try and make it with a lard substitute, then it’s not a pork pie – it’s like having a Rolls Royce with a plastic interior.He continues: “To the uninitiated it looks old, very strange, and dark in colour. If you used any other short pastry it would be soft within hours of baking, because of the moist jelly filling. You need a robust pastry that retains that crunchiness.”Making the pastry The dough is tempered to give it a malleable, mouldable, plasticine-like feel. Using his hands he raises the pastry up around the outside of the dolly. “There is quite a skill in keeping the pastry nice and even all the way round,” says Hallam. “If the dough is too thick or thin, one side might burn while the other side is correctly baked. You end up with a pastry that melts in the mouth – a digestive, almost buttery flavour and texture.”And filling it outThe pie is 50:50 pastry to filling. Boned out British shoulders and bellies of pork are bought in fresh and uncured, then chopped and diced. “We’re not butchers, we’re bakers,” he says. “We find consumers generally don’t understand ‘uncured’, so we liken it to a joint of roast pork in the demonstration.”Dickinson & Morris mills its own pepper and its piquancy teases out the flavour of the pork – no breadcrumbs or rusk are used, which would absorb this piquancy. “A Melton Mowbray pork pie is traditionally quite spicy,” says Hallam.Baking and finishingOn goes the lid, using egg, then the pie goes into the oven with no tin or hoop to give its characteristic bow-sided shape. Baking the pies is a “fastidious” process, he says. “Ours are quite a dark colour compared to some on the market and that’s because we take it as close as we can to burning. I wouldn’t criticise a baker for burning the pies as much as I would criticise them for not baking them enough.”After leaving the pie to cool, it’s filled with jelly made from bone stock boiled from pigs trotters, through two holes made in the case. This adds some moisture back into the meat lost through baking, while adding a comple-mentary flavour. Some onlookers blanch at the mention of pigs’ trotters, so Hallam usually softens the blow by comparing the process to making a homemade soup.Consuming correctlyAnd if learning how to make the pie weren’t enough, Hallam demonstrates how to consume them too. “Always take them out of the fridge an hour before you’re going to eat them,” he urges. “That’s an area where we need to educate the consumer – you can have a super product but destroy it by not treating it properly.”last_img read more

Tillerson’s exit interview

first_img The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Rex Tillerson had seen and learned much in his 41-year career at ExxonMobil Corp., and some of it proved useful in his 13 months as U.S. secretary of state.  But in the end, most of the thorniest challenges the former chairman of the multinational oil giant faced had more to do with his relationship with his boss, President Donald Trump, than with the complexities of geopolitics.That was the overarching message from Tillerson who visited Harvard Tuesday for a private talk about his time as the nation’s top diplomat, a probing 90-minute discussion in which he spoke fluently on issues in global hotspots from North Korea, Syria, and Iran to the negotiating styles of world leaders, including Trump.In panel interview with Professors Nicholas Burns, who runs the Future of Diplomacy Project at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), Robert Mnookin, faculty chair emeritus of the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School (HLS), and James Sebenius, who heads the Harvard Negotiation Roundtable at Harvard Business School (HBS), Tillerson’s daylong visit was organized by the American Secretaries of State Project, a joint initiative run by Burns, Mnookin, and Sebenius, who each lead programs on diplomacy and negotiation at all three Schools.Tillerson, who had extensive experience negotiating directly with heads of state as an oil executive, offered a number of informed assessments of the motivations and tactics used by Russian President Vladimir Putin, whom he first met in 1999, China’s president Xi Jinping and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, whose 10-year reign appears in doubt after Tuesday’s election. He called Netanyahu “an extraordinarily skilled” politician and diplomat, albeit “a bit Machiavellian,” who forges good and “useful” relationships with leaders and nations he anticipates he’ll need at a future time.Tillerson said despite Israel’s closeness with the U.S., “In dealing with Bibi, it’s always useful to carry a healthy amount of skepticism in your discussions with him,” recounting that Israel would share “misinformation” to persuade the U.S. of something if necessary.“They did that with the president on a couple of occasions, to persuade him that ‘We’re the good guys, they’re the bad guys.’ We later exposed it to the president so he understood, ‘You’ve been played,’” said Tillerson. “It bothers me that an ally that’s that close and important to us would do that to us.”When he entered office, Tillerson, who had deep familiarity with leaders and issues in the Middle East, including conditions surrounding the Israel/Palestine peace negotiations, said he thought there was a chance — finally — for peace.“I did believe that we were at a moment in time where perhaps we could chart a way where the Arab world could support an outcome that the Palestinians might not think was perfect — and in the past, if it wasn’t perfect, it didn’t happen — but with enough encouragement, pressure from the Arab world, that we could get it close enough that the Palestinians would finally agree,” he said. “And in my view, it was a two-state solution.”“Every successful negotiation is defined as both parties leaving with an acceptable outcome,” said Tillerson. “If you ever think about a negotiation as a win/lose, you’re going to have a terrible experience, you’re going to be very dissatisfied, and not very many people are going to want to deal with you.” Photo by Tom FitzsimmonsBut his plans were hampered by a frosty relationship with President Trump, who solicited foreign policy advice from an array of outside sources and delegated several key portions of the portfolio, like drafting an Israeli/Palestinian peace accord, to his son-in-law, Jared Kushner.So, in the end, Tillerson took a back seat on most issues involving the Middle East and served as an informal counselor, offering his input “to help them identify obstacles or gaps to the [peace] plan to give it the highest chance of success,” he said.Even though he is no longer in office Tillerson still keeps an eye on developments in the region. Asked what he would have recommended the U.S. do in response to the bombings on Saudi oil facilities, Tillerson said it was vital to wait until forensics can provide the best available information about who is responsible before taking any action, something he acknowledged “may be very hard to do.”“I have no doubt we’re going to find Iran’s fingerprints on this attack, but we may not find their hands on it,” he said, complicating a coalition response.Tillerson said the U.S. should take its case to the U.N. Security Council and build a global coalition for additional sanctions, rather than trying to implement unilateral sanctions, a move he said Iran can manage.On Wednesday morning, Trump said he will “substantially increase” sanctions on Iran, though the administration did not formally declare Iran responsible.While he was often thwarted on foreign policy, Tillerson admitted his own missteps in undertaking a sweeping overhaul of the State Department and instituting a one-year hiring freeze, while the Trump administration slashed the budget from $55 billion to $35 billion in 2017. Sixty percent of top career diplomats resigned and applications for foreign service jobs fell by half during his term, according to American Foreign Service Association.Early on, it was “pretty evident” to him that much of the department was outmoded, from management practices and some of the systems to IT, and there was no clear delegation of authority, as he was used to in the private sector, so he had a hard time understanding “how decisions are made, who’s got authority to make what decisions and who’s accountable,” he said.Tillerson defended the freeze as a way to get managers to reassess their staffing needs and to avoid having new hires be fired in short order if the budget went further south. He also hoped the move would buy him time to lobby the Office of Management and Budget and “see if I couldn’t change their mindset on it where they were just slashing and burning it.”Fifteen of the overhaul recommendations were funded by Congress and implemented, though there’s more room for modernizing State Department management practices and embassies.Though necessary, Tillerson concedes the pace of his revamp may have been “a little too aggressive” for many “and the level of change was so dramatic for a lot of people in what was already a very significant change from the Obama administration to the Trump administration, which was also dramatic and traumatic,” he said. “I didn’t have a full appreciation probably for just how emotional it would become for some people.”Asked about his approach to negotiations, whether in the private sector or as the nation’s top diplomat, Tillerson said he spends 80 percent of his time in preparation. A key to successful talks?  Knowing precisely what your objectives as well as those of your counterparts. “It all goes back to people’s hopes and aspirations,” he said.“So I did a lot of preparation to understand socially and historically, ‘what journey have these people been on that brought them to this point and what are their hopes and their aspirations out of this possibility that they could have this great economic opportunity, or in the case of a diplomatic discussion, what are their hopes and their aspirations that one day they can have a peaceful border or stop the bombing,’ ” said Tillerson. “I’ve seen more negotiations fall apart over an inability to understand those social aspects and those aspirations than fell apart over the deal.”In stark contrast to Trump’s style, Tillerson emphasized transparency, predictability and trustworthiness as critical to his negotiating method, whether it’s with allies or with enemies.“Every successful negotiation is defined as both parties leaving with an acceptable outcome,” he said. “If you ever think about a negotiation as a win/lose, you’re going to have a terrible experience, you’re going to be very dissatisfied, and not very many people are going to want to deal with you.”Tillerson admitted his own frustration with the nation’s riven state. Asked by Burns what gives him hope these days, he said that it was America’s continued evolution as a society, despite the painful, even “tortuous” times.“I always believe deep in those words from Lincoln, that in our deepest, darkest moments, we were able to call upon ‘the better angels of our nature’ to overcome that which we thought was so divisive we could never find affection for one another again,” he said.“I watch with great anguish the mood of the country and the kind of rhetoric that goes on in public …. [and] it pains me. It breaks my heart,” said Tillerson. But I go back to Lincoln, “and my great hope is that that is still defining of the American people.”last_img read more

Candlelight prayer service honoring MLK kicks off Walk the Walk Week

first_imgStudents and University leaders gathered late Sunday evening in the Rotunda of the Main Building to honor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., with a candlelight prayer service.The prayer service was the first event of Walk the Walk Week, a series of events celebrating the life and legacy of King and reflecting on inequality in America. This is the fifth consecutive year the University has held the service.“We turn to God to guide and strengthen us as we seek to answer the Gospel call, and in doing so become a Notre Dame community that is evermore welcoming, just and inclusive,” University President Fr. John Jenkins said at the service. “As Dr. Martin Luther King said, ‘The end is reconciliation; the end is redemption; the end is the creation of the beloved community. It is this type of spirit and this type of love that can transform opposers into friends. It is this type of understanding and goodwill that can transform the deep gloom of the old age into the exuberant gladness of the new age. It is this love that will bring about miracles in the hearts of women and men.’”Jenkins acknowledged this evening prayer was an important time for each individual to reflect on their own actions and shortcomings.“Night prayer in the Christian tradition has always been a time to acknowledge before God what we have done and what we have failed to do,” he said.After performances from the Voices of Faith Gospel Choir, service attendees listened to a recording of King’s speech, “Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam.” Following the recording, a speaker read an excerpt from II Corinthians.Eric Styles, rector for Carroll Hall, used King’s speech and the scripture reading to speak about Notre Dame’s obligation to improve the community.“Saint Paul founded the community in Corinth that was just heard. We know that they experienced real setbacks,” Styles said. “… So perhaps Saint Paul’s experience with the Corinthians might help us to listen with greater clarity to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. King was surely for us, the great American apostle and the refounder of the American Dream. [His sermon] was about his opposition to the Vietnam War. He goes on to say, ‘I have not lost faith, I’m not in despair, because I know there is a moral order.’ In truth, we know that Dr. King struggled with despair and nihilism.”In his speech, Styles also mentioned the unique culture of Notre Dame and its tendency to serve as sanctuary from the outside world.“There is a spirituality of place here in Notre Dame, where the tranquility of the campus and the key of the spiritual life and academic life is preserved and kept familiar as a respite from the hectic, difficult and sometimes disparaging outside world,” he said. “In other words, a glorious Notre Dame bubble.”Styles said the members of the Notre Dame community need to commit themselves to a mission of solidarity with those who are experiencing persecution or oppression.“We thank Fr. Moreau, whose feast day is tomorrow — or even minutes away — for telling us to ‘Hail the cross, our only hope,’” Styles said. “… To live in solidarity with those who are on the margins is to pick up one’s cross and follow Him. To pick up one’s cross is to commit to the sign of hope.”Tags: candlelight prayer service, Martin Luther King Jr., Walk the Walk Weeklast_img read more

Colorado regulators okay Xcel coal plant closure plan

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Denver Post:A plan by Xcel Energy Colorado to boost the share of power it gets from wind and solar and retire a third of its coal generation was green-lighted Monday by state regulators.The Colorado Public Utilities Commission voted 2-1 in support of what Xcel calls the Colorado Energy Plan, which the company says will cut carbon dioxide emissions by nearly 60 percent, increase renewable energy sources to 55 percent of its mix by 2026 and save customers about $213 million.As part of the plan, Xcel, Colorado’s largest electric utility, will phase out its Comanche 1 and 2 coal-fired plants in Pueblo about a decade earlier than the original target date of 2035. Xcel says the plan will invest $2.5 billion in eight counties and save customers about $213 million, thanks to the declining costs of renewable energy.The commission is expected to issue a written decision approving the plan in the first week of September.Xcel’s plan, filed in June, will significantly boost power from renewable energy sources and phase out 660 megawatts of coal power by retiring the two coal-fired units in Pueblo. The utility will add about 1,100 megawatts of wind, 700 megawatts of solar, 275 megawatts of battery storage and 380 megawatts from existing natural gas sources.More: Colorado regulators green-light Xcel’s plan boosting renewables, cutting coal Colorado regulators okay Xcel coal plant closure planlast_img read more

Nevada’s NV Energy says transmission, solar-plus-storage to play key role in new resource plan

first_imgNevada’s NV Energy says transmission, solar-plus-storage to play key role in new resource plan FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Berkshire Hathaway Energy subsidiary NV Energy Inc. on July 20 released a plan to build more than 500 miles of transmission lines and three solar-plus-storage projects as a part of its upcoming integrated resource plan.As part of its “Greenlink Nevada” program, the company plans to build two transmission line segments, one a 235-mile, 525-kV line that cuts across the middle of the state from Ely to Yerington, and the second a 351-mile, 525-kV line from Las Vegas to Yerington. The project also includes three 345-kV lines from Yerington to Reno.Construction is slated to begin in 2020 and will be complete by 2031, the company said in an announcement. NV Energy said the project will generate up to $781 million in economic activity and support more than 4,000 jobs.The state of Nevada is betting on solar-plus-storage projects to reach its renewable portfolio standard, which requires 50% of electricity sales to come from renewable energy sources by 2030.“Greenlink Nevada is essential to unlocking Nevada’s clean energy potential and meeting Nevada’s renewable and de-carbonization goals by providing access to new in-state solar and geothermal resources and creating opportunities to maximize renewable resource opportunities across the west,” Doug Cannon, NV Energy president and CEO, said in the announcement.The company also announced three new solar-plus-storage projects. One is the 150-MW Dry Lake Solar Energy Center, paired with a 100-MW, four-hour battery storage system and located 20 miles northeast of Las Vegas in Clark County. Another is the Boulder Solar III Project, a 128-MW array paired with a 58-MW, four-hour battery storage system, also in Clark County. And the 200-MW Chuckwalla Solar Project in Clark County would include a 180-MW, four-hour battery storage system.[Justin Horwath]More ($): NV Energy announces transmission, solar-plus-storage projectslast_img read more

Festival Recap: CKS Paddlefest

first_imgIt’s that time of the year, folks. The Live Outside and Play team has landed in Colorful Colorado for the Elevation Outdoors portion of our tour. We spent our Memorial Day weekend on the banks of the beautiful Arkansas River in Buena Vista, Colorado. For many years now, CKS Paddlefest has taken over the town of Buena Vista during the official kick-off to the summer weekend. This was our second year and we were stoked to be back. Having just made the drive across the country we were still feeling a bit restless as we hopped in the van to make the two and a half hour drive to Buena Vista form Denver. We made sure to allow ourselves enough time for a quick hike near Twin Lakes, just south of Leadville. We also soaked up some Colorado sun while spending some time on the beach to take in the spectacular view of some of the Collegiate Peaks.We tell people all of the time that Buena Vista is one of our favorite towns. The picturesque camping, the easy access to natural forest and wilderness areas, tasty food, and good people all make this is worthy stop on your summer adventures. I could go on, but that will be the subject of another blog.Paddlefest is hosted in River Park. A pretty section of land right on the Arkansas River on the south end of town. Professional and amateur paddlers alike come from all over to get a piece of The Arkansas in any way that they can. A crowd favorite is the BV Kayak Rodeo. Kayakers surf the rapid below River Park and bust out all sorts of tricks. Have you ever seen someone front flip in a kayak on purpose?We took turns working the booth and taking Henry on mini adventures all weekend long. Everyone camps together in an area right next to the park and just outside of town. The best part about Buena Vista is that you can leave right from town with your boat, mountain bike, or hiking shoes and you’ll never have to drive.There’s something refreshing about working a festival the second time. You spend less time trying to figure out how the festival works and more time with the friends that you made last year. You know how to maximize your adventure time before the day starts.We hung around town on Monday following the festivals and organized a group trash cleanup on the banks of the river where the festival took place. We didn’t find much trash which was excellent but it was a perfect morning, and we always want to leave an area better than we found it. Huge shoutout to CKS and Eddyline Brewery for hooking up everyone who joined with some awesome prizes. On Monday afternoon we packed up and got ready to head back to Denver for a few days. In true LOAP fashion, we stopped for a hike on the way home. We hiked to a small lake nestled beneath Mt. Yale. Everyone had apparently gone home early because we had the trail to ourselves and it was wonderful.There is one way for this tour to be a reality, our sponsors! Sending a thank you shout out to our title sponsor Nite Ize, and all of our other awesome sponsors like Crazy Creek, National Geographic, Sea to Summit, Mountain House, Lowe Alpine, Old Town, Leki, HydraPak, UCO Gear and Wenzel. If you like the gear that keeps us groovin’ click here to enter for a chance to win our Grand Gear Giveaway!last_img read more

Islip Councilwoman Apologizes for Facebook Controversy

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Islip Town Councilwoman Trish Bergin-Weichbrodt apologized Saturday for a social media post she made about several foreign nations that prompted critics to plan a protest outside Islip Town Hall next week.In a since-deleted Facebook post, the Republican former News12 Long Island anchor made a thinly veiled reference to President Donald Trump’s widely reported terming of Haiti and African nations as “shithole countries”“I’m looking a warm getaways for kids February break,” she wrote Friday. “I’m wondering about El Salvador, Haiti or Somalia #recommendations ?”The post, a screen grab of which was saved and has been shared on social media, generated an immediate backlash. On Saturday, it was gone and replaced with an apology.“I have leaned that my Facebook post offended some of you,” she wrote. “Please accept my sincere apology.”The same day, critics started organizing “rally to protest Councilwoman Bergin’s hateful & divisive statement” scheduled for 4 p.m. Tuesday outside town hall.Her supporters said in response that she shouldn’t have apologized.Wow, councilwoman Trish Bergin Weichbrodt is off to a great start… pic.twitter.com/DPID7Jq7AO— Failing at Normal (@failingatnormal) January 20, 2018last_img read more