First four fall pep rallies planned

first_imgStudent body president Catherine Soler said student government is working with the University to make football pep rallies “shorter but more exciting” due to some student dissatisfaction with last year’s rallies.Student body vice president Andrew Bell said student government worked with Game Day Operations, the Athletic Department, football team representatives and Hall Presidents’ Council co-chairs Alexa Doyle and Mike Oliver.“Our discussion focused on the fact that while all alumni, prospective students and members of the Notre Dame community are welcome to the pep rallies, the students and the football team should be the heart of every rally,” Bell said.Soler added: “We hope everyone is excited for pep rally season. It’s a collaborative process, so while the students and the players are the focus, everyone can have a good time.”Soler said first-year Irish football coach Brian Kelly told her he is also excited about improving the pep rallies. She said Kelly want students more involved in creating successful pep rallies.“We hope that students will see that the pep rally format is different,” Bell said. “Some people were disappointed with pep rallies last year but we hope that they will come to the rallies next year and feel engaged and want to be involved.”“The biggest changes Soler and Bell are introducing are new venues and new traditions to enhance the energy and overall experience of pep rallies.“This is the first time that Notre Dame is actively seeking guest speakers for pep rallies,” Soler said. “We want big, exciting people to come and be a part of the experience.”The first pep rally will be the Dillon Hall pep rally on South Quad. “We’re very excited to be back at Dillon, upholding the longstanding tradition,” Bell said, “Last year’s reception and atmosphere were great, but there are ways that it can improve.”Bell said improvements for the Dillon pep rally would include better visibility, sound quality and a shorter length.The second pep rally will be outdoors at Irish Green for the Michigan game. Students voiced concerns about the Irish Green pep rallies after disappointment from this past year.“All of us, including the athletic department, acknowledge that it needs change, but the outdoor pep rally is conducive to a really great atmosphere, similar to the USC pep rally from last year,” Soler said.She said because of the size of the game and expected crowd attending the pep rally, organizers want to emphasize the students and players.“The pep rally will be focused around the players’ theme for the week to give the public a better glimpse at what the players are experiencing,” Soler said. “It’s time to start new traditions with the Kelly era.”One such new tradition, Bell said, will be a student body entrance onto Irish Green. “Each dorm will have its own walkover, but they will all meet somewhere like the flagpole on South Quad,” Bell said. “Then everyone will walk down to the pep rally together.”For the Stanford game, the pep rally will take place for the first time in Purcell Pavilion, reminiscent of the Joyce Center rallies from two years ago.“We all look back and love the old JACC pep rallies, but they weren’t perfect and students were upset about that,” Bell said.While the exact details of how everyone will be situated for the Purcell Pavilion rally are not yet determined, Bell said, there won’t be players sitting in the middle of an empty basketball court and students just sitting around it.Just like last year, there will be a students-only pep rally at Stepan Center for the away game at Boston College. “Next year, Coach Kelly and the entire football team will be there,” Soler said. “We’re excited to have the full support of the team at the pep rally.”Bell said the format for the Stepan rally wouldn’t change much from last year and will include a rowdy atmosphere, loud marching band and the football team.“We expect that it will be packed,” Bell said.  “Stepan didn’t fill up last year, but everyone that went had a great time.”Soler and Bell have only planned the first four pep rallies to be able to take into account student feedback after each one before meeting with their group to plan the rest of the season. “We’re students too, and we went to last year’s pep rallies and see that they need to be improved,” Bell said. “We feel like we are getting the opportunity to discover the best location, length and format to figure out exactly how to get correct focus on the students and the team.”last_img read more

Fighting Irish take flight

first_imgStudents fascinated by game day flyovers will have a chance to get an inside look at what it takes to fly next semester. The Notre Dame Pilot Initiative, an academic program intended to teach students about the fundamentals of flight, will return this spring. The three-credit course, Principles of Flight, is specifically designed to help aspirant pilots pass the written portion of the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) private pilot certification test. Jay Burns, a cadet captain in the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) and certified ground instructor, is leading the effort to bring back the course. He said the class will use much of the same material that helped him pass the FAA test. “I learned to fly from this material when I was still a sophomore in high school, and it certainly helped me pass my FAA written exam to get my private pilot certificate,” Burns said. “I felt that I was more advanced because I’ve had a better background and a deeper understanding of the different concepts that you deal with in aviation.” Burns said he would incorporate additional material used by Joe Friel, a former Air Force ROTC student who led the class the last time it was offered. Friel, now a program manager at Avidyne, the leading provider of cockpit instrumentation for small aircrafts, said he and Newcamp developed the curriculum to offer students an insight into the practical application of flight concepts. “We tried to bring material that was appropriate, but that was in-depth enough to give students a real appreciation for the concepts,” Friel said. “More than just memorizing for the tests, we wanted them to really understand what was making the plan fly.” When the initiative began, Friel said primarily AFROTC students were interested. The second semester, however, he was surprised by a drastic change in class makeup. “We taught some that did want to be pilots and some that didn’t,” Friel said. “One girl that signed up for our course was an artist who drew some of the materials that we used, and who had signed up for the class because she had family members who flew and she wanted more of an appreciation of flying.” Colonel Andrew Cernicky, a professor of Aerospace Studies, a U.S. Air Force pilot and a graduate of Notre Dame’s ROTC program, will co-lead the course with Burns. Cernicky said he was excited when Burns approached him with his plans for revitalizing the initiative, both because he took the course as an undergraduate and because it offered an opportunity to expose students to the fundamentals of flight for the first time. “This class should demystify the process of flying and make it completely understandable,” Cernicky said. “You don’t need to be a scientist or mathematician to take this course, anyone at ND can take it that has an interest in understanding how aircraft fly.” Mary Hession, a sophomore in Notre Dame’s Air Force ROTC, said she is glad the course is designed to be accessible to those without previous experience. As a Russian major, she said the course would be a good introduction to a more technical area of study. “All of the technical majors have more of the background knowledge that corresponds to understanding flying, so this class will help me by giving me that knowledge,” she said. Jordan Hoover, another AFROTC sophomore, said he is taking the class to get exposure to material he may later see in the Air Force’s pilot training. “I’m fairly sure that I want to be a pilot,” Hoover said. “[The course] will give me the experience to know for sure that’s what I want to do, and I’ll have seen the material that I would encounter in pilot training.” Now retired Colonel Mike Zenk, who oversaw the program when it was under Friel’s leadership, said the original class material included many of the elements taught at ground school. Students learned the basics of aerodynamics, FAA rules about airspaces, airport and flight operations, communications with ground crews, safety precautions and pilot navigation skills. “The biggest benefit [of the class] is taking that first step towards actually being able to fly an airplane,” Zenk said. “To help spark that interest or to take their first step towards a dream that they have is the best reason to take the class.”last_img read more

Keeping up with the “Mother of the Huddle”

first_imgIf you’ve ever been to the Huddle during the weekday lunch rush, you’ve probably seen Helen Hiatt restocking napkins with a smile on her face. The 89-year-old Hiatt is considered the “mother of the Huddle” and is arguably the best-loved employee at the LaFortune Student Center’s grocery store. Hiatt has watched over the Huddle since 1967, working her way from the old cigarette counter to the cash register over the past 44 years, during which she became acquainted with many varsity football players, including former quarterbacks Joe Theismann and Joe Montana, as they frequented the Huddle after practice. “They’d come in and talk to me about their problems and different things, and they started calling me their second mother,” Hiatt said. “It continued on and I got to be ‘The Mother of the Huddle’ after so many years.” ND Minute recently caught up with Hiatt, who shared her experience working at the Huddle and explained why she still loves her job.last_img read more

Fans gear up for ‘GameDay’

first_imgStudents will showcase their dedication to Notre Dame football on national television Saturday during filming of ESPN’s “College GameDay.” A pit for 200 students will be located near the commentators, and many fans will camp out the night before to ensure a spot in the crowd.   Senior Kristen Stoutenburgh, executive vice president of Leprechaun Legion, said the group wants as many students as possible to come to the filming. “We want the nation to know that the Legion is the best student section in the country and we’re supporting our team 100 percent,” Stoutenburgh said. “We want a Legion green invasion for ‘GameDay,’ so we want students to come early and wear their green Legion gear.” Leprechaun Legion will sponsor sign making in the JACC Fieldhouse after the pep rally Friday so students can hold up creative posters during the telecast, Stoutenburgh said. The group will also give out free McDonald’s breakfast sandwiches Saturday morning to the first 200 students to show up, she said. “Notre Dame football weekends are special to begin with, but having ‘College GameDay’ on campus adds another level of excitement and energy on campus,” Stoutenburgh said. “We have an awesome opportunity to show the nation that Notre Dame football is back, and the fans couldn’t be more excited about it.” Junior Matt Cunningham, president of Leprechaun Legion, said being featured in “College GameDay” signifies that Notre Dame is a top contender in college football.   “With the national spotlight on Notre Dame, beating Stanford gives us a chance to announce our presence as a legitimate top-10 team,” Cunningham said.   Junior Mark Ambrose said he plans to camp out with friends to be “front and center” for “College GameDay.” “Something like this only comes around once in a while,” Ambrose said. “I remember watching the show as a kid and in high school and always wanting to be a part of the festivities and craziness that goes along with it. It’s really great that they decided to come to ND for once and give us this opportunity.” Ambrose said he doesn’t want to reveal the contents of his sign before the taping, but it pokes fun at “notorious ND haters Mark May and Rick Reilly of ESPN.” Sophomore Conor McCarter said he will hold up a sign that reads, “Even the Lorax won’t save these trees,” referring to the Stanford Tree, a feature of the school’s marching band.   “It bothers me how no one’s heard about Notre Dame,” McCarter said. “I hope [being featured on ‘College GameDay’] can help to make us relevant again.” Junior Ben Finan said bringing College GameDay to Notre Dame calls into question ESPN correspondent Rick Reilly’s pre-season assertion that Notre Dame football is irrelevant. “ESPN just ran the Rick Reilly article about Notre Dame, and for them to then turn around and have his company choose to come here contradicts their highest-paid journalist,” Finan said. “[‘College GameDay’ has] only got 13, 14 appearances a year. Notre Dame’s clearly relevant. It is a benefit because it does say, ‘Notre Dame’s back on the map.’” But Finan said he does not plan to attend the taping because he went the last time “College GameDay” came to Notre Dame for the 2005 game against USC. “I was kind of underwhelmed by the production,” he said. “It was just so many people and very hard to hear and understand what was going on while you were in the crowd, and basically all it is anytime they come back to a commercial or go to a commercial, they show the crowd and you hold up your sign.” Finan said he fears the presence of “College GameDay” on campus will disturb the traditional pre-game atmosphere. “People generally are wandering all around campus,” Finan said. “I feel like this will create a gravitation point of something that will take away from people going to the Grotto and the Basilica, and it will take away from people cooking out on the quad because people are going to be so drawn to this national name of ‘College GameDay’ and going to Library Quad, which is where people already are.” Finan said he is more excited for “Mike and Mike in the Morning” to film on campus Friday. Ambrose said the publicity will make the football weekend better for fans. “I think it’ll add to the overall game atmosphere,” he said. “Obviously with Michigan being a night game, that in itself made it a crazy atmosphere, but with GameDay on campus it’s only going to make the game atmosphere even crazier for this huge game. It also doesn’t hurt to have the nation pay attention to us in light of our undefeated start, [which is] hopefully a good sign that Notre Dame football is indeed back.” While the hype before the game may draw positive attention to Notre Dame, Finan said he fears it may contribute to an unfortunate result. “There’s always a let-down game,” Finan said. “I feel like [because of] the amp up for the Miami game, despite being awesome and playing a great game, we could experience a hangover this weekend, and GameDay is contributing to that.”last_img read more

Mass honors D’Arcy’s life

first_imgThe Notre Dame community will commemorate the life of Bishop Emeritus John D’Arcy of the Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend at a Mass today in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart, University Spokesman Dennis Brown announced in an email Tuesday. University President Fr. John Jenkins will preside over the 5:15 p.m. service. Theology professor John Cavadini, director of the Institute for Church Life, will deliver a eulogy for D’Arcy. D’Arcy, who passed away Sunday, visited Notre Dame often during his tenure as bishop to celebrate Mass, ordain Holy Cross priests and deacons and administer the Sacrament of Confirmation for members of the University community. He received the Rev. Howard J. Kenna, CSC, award in 2003 for his service to Notre Dame and the Congregation of Holy Cross.last_img read more

Jenkins’ address invokes Catholic mission

first_imgDrawing upon Notre Dame’s Catholic mission, University President Fr. John Jenkins delivered his annual address to a theater full of faculty at the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center on Tuesday afternoon. Jenkins celebrated the diligence of Notre Dame’s professors, deans, advisors and officials, while also calling attention to the University’s progressive aspirations. Jenkins said the contributions of faculty members are of substantial importance for the University’s mission. He commended faculty for creating real, tangible value through academics, while reflecting upon an excerpt from the late Seamus Heaney, an Irish poet and holder of an honorary degree from Notre Dame. “Like Heaney’s poetry-writing, your work as faculty is generally not strenuous physical labor, but the work of the mind and imagination,” Jenkins said. “Yet it is as demanding and productive as [the work of] those engaged in physical labor.” The University is seeking more funding to pursue its greatest aspirations, while being fiscally responsible and respecting the University’s Catholic mission, Jenkins said. Among these aspirations are newly proposed additions to Notre Dame Stadium, which Jenkins said are designed to enrich academics and student life.  Jenkins said the Central Campus Planning Project has made great strides in planning potential stadium renovations.  “The group has made great progress and considered the possibility of a student center adjacent to the stadium, buildings to house one or more academic departments and space for a digital media center,” he said. In response to a question about the potential addition of sexual orientation to the University’s anti-discrimination clause, Jenkins said law mandates everything that is already detailed in the clause and he saw no need to tamper with it. He also said all specific matters of discrimination, no matter the cause, should be brought to his attention. Jenkins’ address also touched upon key changes in the digital world. He said the University plans to create a modifiable website for tracking developments. He also discussed the reallocation of funds toward engineering and the sciences to prepare Notre Dame students for this changing world.  However, in an age of online courses and virtual degrees, Jenkins said Notre Dame must continue to offer something more. “I do not believe it will ever be possible to deliver the richness of a Notre Dame education wholly on-line,” he said. “An essential part of a Notre Dame education is the community that comes from physical proximity, the relationships that are developed among students and between students and professors, and the serendipity of critical insights through unplanned interactions.” Jenkins said an example of Notre Dame offering more than an online experience is the University’s student satisfaction statistics.  “The percentage of Notre Dame seniors who report being ‘very satisfied’ with the ‘overall quality of instruction’ at Notre Dame stands at 57 percent, more than 20 points above the national average among other highly selective private universities,” he said.  Similarly, 98 percent of Notre Dame undergraduates consistently report satisfaction. Even with this level of student approval, Notre Dame’s true standard of education is not easily quantified, Jenkins said.  “Although a Notre Dame education makes sense in financial terms, its value cannot and should not be reduced to an analysis of our graduates’ future earning potential,” he said.  Jenkins said the moral formation and social efficacy instilled in students by the Notre Dame experience is what ought to be emphasized. “As we undertake the curriculum review, we must do so with those educational ideals at the center of our concerns,” he said.last_img read more

Scholar connects atheism to cultural shifts

first_imgNoted British literary theorist Terry Eagleton explored the relationship between the postmodern movement, religion, atheism and fundamentalism in his lecture “The Death of God and the War on Terror” on Wednesday at the Eck Visitors Center auditorium. The English department sponsored the event.“Religion has played, traditionally, such a vital role in legitimating political regimes that our rulers could hardly look upon the disappearance of God with any degree of equanimity,” Eagleton said. “Religion is an exceedingly hard act to follow. Indeed it has been proved to be by far the most universal symbolic system humanity has ever known.”  Emmet Farnan | The Observer According to Eagleton, the “death of God” and the shift towards atheism was due largely to evolving ideas of market and capitalist mentality, as well as the influence of postmodernism in Western culture. Eagleton said capitalism and utilitarian market systems, as ideas that do not necessarily involve metaphysical or moral concepts, create a tension with morally-based systems such as democracy.“It was the inherently rationalist, utilitarian, pragmatic, mental logic of the marketplace which has rendered such high-sounding and edifying metaphysical notions as implausible,” Eagleton said.Eagleton said notions of cultural relativism and the importance humans put on the anthropological aspect of culture influence our beliefs.“Culture is as precious as it is because it was seen to offer in a hopelessly divided society a ground of fundamental reconciliation,” he said. “Only religion has been able, I think, on a widespread scale, to link up these two aspects of culture.”According to Eagleton, religion connects the two definitions of culture, an anthropological version and a high art concept, that are key to the human experience. Eagleton said the shift away from God as a central focus of culture has created a new relationship between government and culture and changed the role that relationship plays in understanding humanity.“There is a kind of complicity between cultural customs that becomes deeply involved in political questions,” Eagleton said. “What that means is that culture has become part of the problem, rather than part of the solution”.Eagleton said religious fundamentalism arose as a response to the rapid social movement away from religion as Western civilization developed. He cited events such as the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks and other instances of religious fundamentalism as responses to western capitalism.“Religious fundamentalism is a momentous, historic shift in western civilization,” Eagleton said. “Fundamentalism has its source not so much in hatred as in anxiety. It’s the pathological mind set of those who feel ‘washed up’ by the brave new world of capitalism.”Tags: atheism, capitalism, culture, fundamentalism, religion, Terry Eagletonlast_img read more

2016 Election Observer: David Campbell

first_imgEditor’s Note: Throughout the 2016 presidential campaign, The Observer will sit down with Notre Dame experts to break down the election and its importance to students. In this first installment, Managing Editor Jack Rooney asks Political Science Department Chair David Campbell about the upcoming primaries and the biggest issues of the campaign.Jack Rooney: Iowa caucuses in less than two weeks and New Hampshire votes about a week after that. With voting now imminent and Donald Trump still near the top of most Republican polls, does he actually have a shot at the nomination? David Campbell: This, of course, is the $64,000 question. Everything we know—or thought we knew—about presidential nominations has been upended by Trump. Based on past research, it would seem that he does not have a chance—his supporters have a low likelihood of turning out, the party establishment is against him and (it is easy to forget) he is actually not all that conservative. On the other hand, he keeps defying expectations. I would put his chances, however, at no better than 1 in 3.JR: For the Democrats, Hillary Clinton seems to be the consensus candidate within the party. Is there any way she doesn’t get the nomination?DC: She is definitely the odds-on favorite. While it is tempting to compare Sanders to Obama in 2008, when Obama was able to beat Clinton in spite of her frontrunner status, there are big differences between them. For one thing, Clinton’s lead in endorsements among the Democratic establishment is much greater this year than in 2008. And Sanders is no Obama. His difficulty attracting support among minorities is a huge problem for him.JR: The primary debates, especially the Republican debates, seem to have generated more interest and attention this campaign. Based on political science research, though, how much do the debates matter for candidates and voters?DC: Debates are like pep rallies, as they can fire up supporters. But they rarely change voters’ minds.JR: Moving beyond the upcoming primaries, in your research and opinion, which issue or issues are set to play the biggest role in the general election?DC: At home, income inequality and the uneven performance of the economy are sure to be top issues — that is, by many indicators, the economy is booming, and yet wages have stagnated. I am curious to see whether the Democratic nominee decides to make gun control a high priority issue. In the past, they have skirted this, but it has recently become more salient. Abroad, expect to hear a lot of discussion about ISIS and safeguarding Americans from terrorism. Historically, this would make the election like a combination of 2004 — a national security election — and 2008, which was focused more on the domestic economy.JR: More specific to a college campus like Notre Dame, which issue do you think should matter most to college students this election cycle?DC: I would pick two. First, the inequality in the current economic system is a pressing issue, as it means that America is losing its traditional middle class. This affects all of us. Second, the environment should continue to be a concern, as it is for many millennials already. While I do not expect the environment to be a top issue in the general election, this does not negate its importance for the rising generation.Tags: 2016, 2016 presidential campaign, 2016 Presidential Election, Debates, Donald Trump, hillary clinton, income inequality, Iowa Caucus, ISIS, New Hampshire Primary, political sciencelast_img read more

Belles debate the usefulness of Trumper

first_imgSenior Kerry Rose McDonald entered Trumper, the 24-hour computer cluster facility located in the basement of the Saint Mary’s library, around 11:30 p.m. one evening to print a document. She said she knew who was going to be there working for the entire night as soon as she glanced around.“I see the snacks spread,” she said. “I see the blankets. I see the hoodies. Girls taking naps on the couch. It’s a little early for that, but they’re already in full Trumper mode.”McDonald said she knew of the late nights that some Belles — who she refers to as “Trumpernites” — spend in Trumper to get assignments done that are typically due the following day. She said she too has spent a long night there with classmates, beginning work at 1 a.m. and finishing at 6:30 a.m.As soon as McDonald printed her assignment that night, she said, she sent a message to her best friend, junior Anna Babiak:“I have to be honest,” McDonald said in her message. “I was so inspired, I genuinely wished I had my backpack with me, so I could stay and crank out some homework. I felt so bad leaving my soldiers out there in the battlefield. I felt them look at me with envy as I simply came for a quick, printing visit.“That’s the sense of community, pride and belonging you feel when you’re a Trumpernite,” she said.“And I will never feel that,” Babiak said in response.Babiak said she does not understand how students can work in Trumper, citing many reasons she does not enjoy the space.“I don’t work productively down there — there is a lot wrong with it,” Babiak said. “Number one: the lighting. Horrible. There’s zero natural light. No windows. You feel like you’re in a dungeon, maybe even a prison. I will concede that the computers are nice. The chairs? Horrible. So uncomfortable and old. They need new chairs.”Though Babiak does not enjoy the space, she said she is happy others can feel a sense of camaraderie in Trumper.“For me, I feel a sense of stress,” she said. “Having everybody down there, furiously working away — I also don’t do well hearing all these side conversations. My mind is very distracted. I can’t focus. I get very little done. And I have tried. I have tried Trumper.”Babiak said she does not frequently visit Trumper, and one of her worst trips there was with McDonald.“The one night that we went together was probably my worst because I was very stressed that night and we were picking classes that night, and I just had a huge assignment I had to do and I wasn’t being super productive,” she said.On the other hand, McDonald said she was “in [her] element” that evening.“I stayed there after she left,” McDonald said. “I mean, how could I not? It’s an irresistible study place. I feel like when I go there, I enter this energy of productivity. It could be 4 a.m. — that’s why I like that there are no windows, I have no sense of time.”Babiak disagreed that Trumper’s lack of windows was an upside to the space.“That’s horrible,” Babiak said. “Again, a dungeon.”McDonald said she does not let her friend’s criticisms deter her love for the space and her fellow Trumpernites. The conversations and connections she forges with other students help McDonald maintain focus, she said.“You know what motivates me? … Belles,” McDonald said. “Belles motivate me. So if we’re all crying over the same lit review that we have to write, it’s inspiring. It’s knowing that I’m not in this alone. That’s the whole point. You’re not in it alone. It’s a community. It’s a team effort.”Babiak said she prefers secluded spaces to study to get her work done efficiently.“I think I just feel less pressure when I’m by myself and can just do it,” she said. “Also, I don’t enjoy being up late doing things. I only [stay up late] if it’s necessary. I think that’s the difference. I’m not super productive [in Trumper], so I need to be in a place that allows me to be productive.”McDonald said there are many reasons for her love of Trumper, including “the sense of community, the dedication, the perseverance, the determination to complete these assignments not as one but as a whole.”Babiak said she cannot support the space by using it herself, but she acknowledges that some students may find solace in Trumper.“Overall, I just think that the structure of it doesn’t work for me,” she said. “So if there’s a spot where you [can work], you do you. At a certain point, you just have to find a study spot that is productive for you. And no windows and bad lighting and bad seats doesn’t work for me. And smelly bathrooms.”Tags: Computer lab, Saint Mary’s library, Trumper, Trumperniteslast_img read more

Candlelight prayer service honoring MLK kicks off Walk the Walk Week

first_imgStudents and University leaders gathered late Sunday evening in the Rotunda of the Main Building to honor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., with a candlelight prayer service.The prayer service was the first event of Walk the Walk Week, a series of events celebrating the life and legacy of King and reflecting on inequality in America. This is the fifth consecutive year the University has held the service.“We turn to God to guide and strengthen us as we seek to answer the Gospel call, and in doing so become a Notre Dame community that is evermore welcoming, just and inclusive,” University President Fr. John Jenkins said at the service. “As Dr. Martin Luther King said, ‘The end is reconciliation; the end is redemption; the end is the creation of the beloved community. It is this type of spirit and this type of love that can transform opposers into friends. It is this type of understanding and goodwill that can transform the deep gloom of the old age into the exuberant gladness of the new age. It is this love that will bring about miracles in the hearts of women and men.’”Jenkins acknowledged this evening prayer was an important time for each individual to reflect on their own actions and shortcomings.“Night prayer in the Christian tradition has always been a time to acknowledge before God what we have done and what we have failed to do,” he said.After performances from the Voices of Faith Gospel Choir, service attendees listened to a recording of King’s speech, “Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam.” Following the recording, a speaker read an excerpt from II Corinthians.Eric Styles, rector for Carroll Hall, used King’s speech and the scripture reading to speak about Notre Dame’s obligation to improve the community.“Saint Paul founded the community in Corinth that was just heard. We know that they experienced real setbacks,” Styles said. “… So perhaps Saint Paul’s experience with the Corinthians might help us to listen with greater clarity to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. King was surely for us, the great American apostle and the refounder of the American Dream. [His sermon] was about his opposition to the Vietnam War. He goes on to say, ‘I have not lost faith, I’m not in despair, because I know there is a moral order.’ In truth, we know that Dr. King struggled with despair and nihilism.”In his speech, Styles also mentioned the unique culture of Notre Dame and its tendency to serve as sanctuary from the outside world.“There is a spirituality of place here in Notre Dame, where the tranquility of the campus and the key of the spiritual life and academic life is preserved and kept familiar as a respite from the hectic, difficult and sometimes disparaging outside world,” he said. “In other words, a glorious Notre Dame bubble.”Styles said the members of the Notre Dame community need to commit themselves to a mission of solidarity with those who are experiencing persecution or oppression.“We thank Fr. Moreau, whose feast day is tomorrow — or even minutes away — for telling us to ‘Hail the cross, our only hope,’” Styles said. “… To live in solidarity with those who are on the margins is to pick up one’s cross and follow Him. To pick up one’s cross is to commit to the sign of hope.”Tags: candlelight prayer service, Martin Luther King Jr., Walk the Walk Weeklast_img read more