Spartans track, swimming standouts commit to colleges

first_imgRed Bluff >> Track and cross country runner Naomi Renfroe and swimmer Julia Brandt celebrated the last day of school Thursday by signing letters of intent to attend Vanguard University and Lewis and Clark College, respectively, on athletic scholarships.Renfroe got her start running 5K events when she was 12 and focused on long distant events while a student at Vista Middle School. That passion extended into high school, where she ran the 3,200M, 1,600M and 800M events on the track team and 5K …last_img read more

Black cutworm and armyworm counts on the rise

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Last week, both Purdue University and the University of Kentucky reported high black cutworm catches. In addition, UKY caught a large number of armyworms in one of their traps.  Both of these moth species migrate into our area, lay eggs, and the developing larvae can be significant pests of corn and wheat.Black cutworm—Females like to lay eggs in fields with heavy weed cover; weeds like chickweed are especially favored by black cutworm. As these weeds are killed by tillage or herbicide, the larvae move to emerging corn.  Unfortunately, there aren’t good “pre-control” options.  Although there are some hotspots for egg laying, these predictions are far from exact. Insecticidal seed treatments do not offer much protection, and tank-mixing an insecticide with early burn-down has limited efficacy if scouting has not been done to see if larvae are present.  Instead, we recommend rescue treatments which are very effective in controlling damage.  If more than 3% of corn are showing damage, corn is in the V2-V6 stage, and larvae are less than 1 inch, treatment may be needed. We will provide updates over the next few weeks as planting begins (hopefully…) and if damage is reported.Armyworm—Females like to eggs in grasses, especially wheat, where egg hatch occurs over a couple of weeks.  As the larvae develop, they can defoliate wheat plants, leading to yield loss. If corn is planted into wheat fields or other grassy cover, then, like black cutworms, armyworms can also move onto corn.  Again, like black cutworm, the best way to control armyworm is scouting and rescue treatments. We rarely see economic damage from armyworm, except in outbreak years and it is too early to know if this year is an outbreak. We will provide updates over the next few weeks.last_img read more

Germany’s Bioenergy Villages

first_imgThe notion that a village can produce as much energy as it consumes is not new in Germany, nor is it exclusive to this country that has set aggressive targets for renewable energy use. In the mid-1990s, for example, the Austrian village of Güssing began implementing strategies to use local biomass to produce electricity and heat, and the Danish island community of Samsø installed wind turbines to meet its electrical needs.In recent years, however, the idea of Bioenergiedörfer, or “bioenergy villages,” seems to have captured the public imagination in Germany. Last month I attended a conference called “Bioenergy Villages 2014” that provided a great overview of the bioenergy village movement in Germany. Energy security and affordabilityAlthough bioenergy villages have characteristics in common with one another, they may differ widely in form. As one speaker at the conference put it, “The commonality of bioenergy villages is their broad individuality.” In other words, there is not one prescription for success. Bioenergy villages vary in organizational structure, raw materials used, technology installed, and financing models employed. However, these communities tend to have common goals.The most frequently expressed motivation for developing a bioenergy village is to ensure the future availability and affordability of energy supplies. Second on the list is to keep money in the local economy. A quote that surfaced several times during the conference comes from 19th century German cooperative pioneer Friedrich Wilhelm Raiffeisen: “Das Geld des Dorfes dem Dorfe” — “the village’s money to the village.”While environmental concerns certainly play a role in the development of bioenergy villages, surveys reveal that the potential environmental benefits — particularly with regard to climate change — tend not to be the most compelling motivator for many people. RELATED ARTICLES Germany’s Plus-Energy TownVäxjö, Sweden, is a Model of Sustainability Could we do it here?What lessons do Germany’s bioenergy villages hold for the U.S.? I have been pondering this question with regard to my own community and region. I live in a section of the Connecticut River Valley that was once characterized by thriving manufacturing communities — the so-called Precision Valley. I see similarities between the villages — some of them struggling — in New Hampshire and Vermont with which I am familiar, and many of the rural villages I have seen in Germany — especially those in the former East Germany.The challenges of translating Germany’s success with bioenergy villages to New England are admittedly substantial. Germany’s rural villages tend to be very compact, surrounded by open farmland. Americans like to spread out. Although the German government has not specifically targeted bioenergy villages for financial support, many of the Energiewende’s programs encourage investment in the renewable energy systems on which bioenergy villages are based.Technologies that are common in Germany, such as biogas installations (roughly 8,000 to date), village-scale cogeneration plants, and district heating systems, have not been widely implemented in the U.S. Lower retail electricity prices in the U.S. make cogeneration potentially less attractive, and the availability of natural gas has undoubtedly hampered development of the biogas industry.Culturally, Germans generally seem to value consensus and cooperative action more than we do in the U.S. This cultural bias can be seen in the realm of national politics as well as in local communities.Despite the differences between Germany and the U.S. in the geographic, political, technological, and cultural landscapes, the fundamental lesson that I take from Germany’s bioenergy village movement is that success is possible, and even likely, given sufficient commitment from residents. The details of historic New England villages becoming net positive producers of energy will undoubtedly differ from those of Germany’s Bioenergiedörfer, but the compelling benefits will be similar. Every year, thousands of visitors descend on Jühnde to be educated and inspired. These days the town produces over twice as much electricity as it consumes. The citizens are now participating in an electro-mobility pilot project that is exploring ways to use the excess power to serve local transportation needs.The examples of Jühnde and other early adopters of the bioenergy village concept have encouraged communities throughout Germany to pursue similar strategies. During the past nine years, the knowledge base to support the development of bioenergy villages has grown rapidly. The local and region-wide economic benefits of these villages have also been well documented. There are currently about 150 communities in Germany that are officially registered as bioenergy villages. Hundreds more are in the planning phases. ARTICLES BY ANDREW DEY A Construction Trade Fair in GermanyVisiting a District Heating Plant in AustriaA Visit to a German Home CenterA German Deep-Energy RetrofitGermany’s Energy RevolutionAn Energy-Efficiency Conference in Germany Coming up with a definition for “bioenergy village”Determining the precise number of bioenergy villages in Germany is difficult because there is not a single, broadly accepted definition of the term, and because communities are developing their capabilities rapidly. On a website called “Toward the Bioenergy Village”, Germany’s Ministry of Food and Agriculture lists the following criteria for bioenergy villages:At least 50% of the community’s energy needs (electricity and heat) are supplied by locally produced bioenergy (typically silage plants and/or wood chips);Local citizens are actively involved in developing the ideas and making the decisions;The biomass used as a resource is owned at least partially by the villagers, and is grown and harvested locally, in a sustainable manner;Other renewable energy sources may supplement the generation of power and heat from biomass;Energy efficiency and energy conservation measures are regularly considered and implemented;Value is created locally, and the benefits extend regionally.A complementary framework for defining bioenergy villages is provided by one of the organizations that sponsored the conference, the Institute for Applied Resource Management. This organization views the development of bioenergy villages in terms of the following five pillars:Electricity production;Heat production;Energy efficiency;Land-use management;Civic engagement. Phased developmentBioenergy villages are typically developed in phases. In its recently published “Guide to the Practical Implementation of Bioenergy Villages” (Bioenergiedörfer: Leitfaden für eine praxisnahe Umsetzung), Germany’s Institute for Renewable Resources (Fachagentur Nachwachsende Rohstoffe) lists these phases as:Initiation;Preliminary Planning and Groundwork;Detailed Planning and Construction;Operating and Optimizing;Further Development.The initial idea for a bioenergy village may come from individuals, from a group within a village, from an agricultural cooperative, or from a local business. The initiators undertake a preliminary assessment of the energy needs of the community, and the potential for these needs to be served by renewable resources. Local residents are surveyed to gauge their interest in participating, and to clarify their motivations. Ideally during this initial phase, a foundation of trust within the community is recognized and strengthened.Specific questions that are addressed include:Does the village have sufficient biomass potential to sustainably support the production of electricity and heat, without competing for other important needs?Is there strong interest among the residents to be connected to a district heating network?Are there large heat sinks within the community, such as a swimming pool, a school, large town buildings, or industrial facilities that could be integrated into the network?Are infrastructure projects such as street improvements, water/sanitation upgrades, or fiber optic installation being planned that could be combined with the burial of district heating pipes?On what areas should a feasibility study focus, how should the study be funded, and who within the community will oversee that process?center_img Andrew Dey’s background includes carpentry, contracting, and project management. For the past six years he has provided construction consulting services to clients in New Hampshire, Vermont, and Massachusetts. He is passionate about retrofitting existing buildings — including his own house — for greater energy efficiency. His blog is called Snapshots from Berlin. Feasibility studyThe “Detailed Planning and Building” phase typically starts with commissioning a comprehensive feasibility study that forms the basis of ongoing planning. The feasibility study outlines the extent of the heating network and the capacity of the heating plant. It includes financial, technical and environmental parameters such as annual operating costs, ROI, pipe dimensions, transmission losses, cost increases, and CO2-savings. The calculations include an estimate of the cost of the heat to be supplied to buildings on the network.In Germany, such feasibility studies might cost €15,000 to €30,000 ($20,000 to $40,000), and take three to six months to complete. While the feasibility study is underway, financing for the project can be lined up. Based on the feasibility study, agreements are executed with the biomass suppliers, the contractors who will build the energy production and distribution systems, and the consumers of the heat and power. With the appropriate contracts in place, the design and engineering are finalized, and construction can begin.“Operating and Optimizing” a village-scale energy system requires ongoing training of personnel, troubleshooting issues that arise, and adjusting the system for optimal performance. As new buildings are constructed and more resources become available, additional buildings can be connected to the district heating network. Improvements to the efficiency of system components are also made — for example by reducing the heating requirement of buildings in the village, or improving the efficiency of pumps.“Further Development” takes many forms, including the implementation of innovative technologies and programs (process heat for commercial/industrial use, eco-tourism, electro-mobility, etc.), the installation of photovoltaic arrays and wind turbines, the construction of additional biogas generators and cogeneration plants, and region-wide outreach and education. How big an investment is required?Data available from bioenergy villages that have been operating for years are available to help guide these initial discussions. For example, the time-frame required to plan and implement a biogas generation plant coupled with cogeneration and a district heating network is typically two to four years.The initial capital investment for such systems may be between 0.5 and 4 million Euros ($700,000 to $5,500,000). The capital that a village cooperative typically invests is between €50,000 and €500,000 ($70,000 and $700,000). The price that a building owner might pay to connect to the district heating system ranges from €0 to €12,000, with an average cost of about €4,000 ($5,500).Typically between 50% and 80% of the buildings in a village are connected to the district heating network. Heating costs for residents connected to these networks have been ranging from €100 to €400 ($140 to $550) per year. In terms of land-use, between 100 and 500 hectares (between 250 and 1,200 acres) of forest are required when forestry waste is used to fuel a central boiler, and between 50 and 300 hectares (between 125 and 750 acres) of cultivated land can supply a biogas generator with the silage plants that are typically combined with manure. These numbers are wide-ranging because they depend on a variety of factors such as the size of the village, the configuration of the buildings, and the resources available.During the “Preliminary Planning and Groundwork” phase, working groups are typically formed to focus on specific areas such as management, technology, biomass, financing and communications. The working group on management develops models for owning and operating the energy systems, and establishes the appropriate legal entities.The technology working group researches options, visits existing bioenergy installations, and narrows the choice of technologies.The biomass working group confirms with local producers the sustainable supply of biomass, and develops logistics for harvesting, storage and delivery.The financing working group investigates subsidies and grants, contacts local banks, and assesses the potential for direct investment from members of the community.As skillful communication is a cornerstone of successful bioenergy villages, the working group on communications develops and implements a communication plan that encourages participation, emphasizes transparency of process, provides educational resources, and addresses specific concerns of the residents. Allaying local concernsWhile these phases provide a convenient outline for planning the development of a bioenergy village, the reality is not so neat or predictable. Challenges to the process — both legitimate and ill-informed — can arise at every stage. Doubts will be raised about the projected costs, the efficiency and reliability of the installations, the potential environmental impacts, and disruption due to truck traffic.The Bioenergiedörfer movement in Germany has accumulated a wealth of experience to allay these concerns. Additional guidance is provided by studies of bioenergy villages that have identified common factors contributing to success, including:One or more Zugpferde (“draft horses”) — citizens who tirelessly champion the project;A strong sense of community spirit and trust;Clear and frequent communication, and transparent processes;Broad and strong engagement of community members;A comprehensive and reliable feasibility study;Efficient and determined planning and implementation;Relatively low connection costs to the district heating system;Resultant heating costs that are competitive with (or lower than) the status quo.One additional success factor is the ability of bioenergy village residents to see their community as a role model that can instruct and inspire other villages in the region and beyond. Several presenters at the conference suggested that a critical mass of experience and capability is being reached that could significantly accelerate the development of bioenergy villages.However, this optimism was tempered at the conference by pointed references to the government’s current discussions about revising the law that provides financial incentives for renewable energy production — the so-called EEG 2.0. In order to try to curb what many perceive as unsustainable increases in the retail cost of electricity, the government may cut some of these incentives. Biogas installations and cogeneration plants are seen as potential losers in these negotiations. A village that produces twice as much power as it consumesThe first village in Germany to be officially recognized as a bioenergy village was Jühnde, in the state of Lower Saxony. In 2005, a cooperative within this village of 780 inhabitants and 450 cows built a biogas production facility fueled by silage plants and manure. The gas from this plant is burned in a communally owned cogeneration plant that provides electricity and heat to buildings in the village. Eventually a wood chip-fired boiler was added to the district heating system to provide supplemental heat (see Image #2, below). Scaling the conceptAs the number of bioenergy villages in Germany increases, attention is increasingly being paid to scaling these efforts to regions, towns, and cities. The conference presenters showcased a number of towns and cities that have built on the concept of the bioenergy village. These larger communities typically have multiple cogeneration units fueled by biogas and natural gas that provide heat and power to neighborhoods and to complexes of buildings such as hospitals and schools. Photovoltaic arrays and wind turbines often contribute to the supply of locally produced power.In addition to being broadened geographically, the concept of bioenergy villages is being recognized as having diverse demographic benefits. I was struck at this conference, as I have been at others here in Germany, by the way in which themes relating to social justice are brought into discussions about renewable energy and energy efficiency. (Any American who thinks that Obama is a socialist should try living in Europe for a while).Like many other countries, Germany is seeing a general migration of young people from rural to urban areas. By creating jobs and fostering innovation, bioenergy villages provide opportunities for rural youth. The conference presentations highlighted numerous examples of villages that have been re-energized and re-capitalized through their own efforts.At the other end of the demographic spectrum, retirees in these villages are often living on fixed incomes that have been outpaced by increases in the cost of electricity and heat. Stabilizing the cost of utilities is particularly helpful to the elderly and the poor, who spend a relatively high proportion of their income on these basic necessities.While the measurable benefits of bioenergy villages are well-documented, a less tangible but oft-mentioned outcome is the sense of empowerment that is shared by the villagers. Communities take pride in creating their own electricity and heat, in reducing Germany’s dependence on foreign energy suppliers (read: Russia, lately), and in helping to achieve the goals of the country’s ambitious Energiewende, or Energy Transition.last_img read more

School Water Often Goes Untested for Lead

first_imgSchools in 35 states are not required to test their drinking water for lead,  research by The Center for Green Schools has found. In the remaining 15 states and the District of Columbia, testing may be encouraged rather than required, and not all states require that parents be notified of the results, U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) said. The report, “Perspectives on State Legislation Concerning Lead Testing in School Drinking Water,” said that federal laws do not offer any protection to students from possible exposure to lead in water available at school. State laws that address the issue are very recent, the USGBC said in a release, with the earliest law enacted in Ohio just two years ago.RELATED ARTICLESIs Your Drinking Water Safe?Is There Lead in the Water of Your Green Building?Piping as PoisonStudy Finds EPA Lax in Protecting California WaterManaging Lead Paint Hazards Lead is a dangerous neurotoxin that can hinder brain development in children. Federal law requires that regulated water systems test both the supply and representative outlets for contaminants, but it does not require local authorities to test water in the schools. The Center for Green Schools, part of the USGBC organization, said the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has issued guidance for reducing lead exposure in schools, but makes it voluntary. “The result of the existing federal regulatory framework is that without state action — whether administrative or legislative — many school outlets will not be tested for lead,” the report says. “Without identifying and addressing elevated levels that may be present in schools, any exposure of students and staff to lead will continue unabated.” The report notes that a 2006 recommendation from the EPA suggested that remediation begin when lead is found in concentrations of 20 parts per billion (ppb). But a rewrite of the “3Ts for Reducing Lead in Drinking Water” announced last month has no specific remediation trigger. Instead, schools were directed to consult with local and state authorities and emphasized that there is no safe level of lead for children, according to the report. A survey by the U.S. Government Accountability Office this year said that 43% of school districts had tested water for lead. Forty-one percent had not tested, and the remaining 16% didn’t know one way or the other. The Center said that the 16 testing laws it reviewed are a “promising start” and offer an opportunity to other states to find “even better, more efficient” ways of ensuring students are not exposed to lead.last_img read more

What Encourages Disclosure of Childhood Sexual Abuse?

first_imgReferences[1] McElvaney, R.,  Greene, S. & Hogan, D. (2014). To tell or not to tell? Factors influencing young people’s informal disclosures of child sexual abuse. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 29(5), 928-947. doi: 10.1177/0886260513506281This post was written by Jay Morse & Heidi Radunovich, PhD, members of the MFLN Family Development (FD) team which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn. Jay Morse and Heidi Radunovich, PhDVictims of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) often struggle with whether or not to tell anyone about their sexual abuse, and sometimes delay disclosure for years, if they disclose at all. But what can be done to increase the likelihood of disclosing CSA? In a recent qualitative study in Ireland, McElvaney, Greene, and Hogan (2014) examined informal disclosure of CSA, considering events leading up to, during, and following disclosure.[Flickr, Sad by U.S. Fotografle, CC BY-ND 2.0] Retrieved on September 17, 2015The researchers interviewed 22 children and adolescents, and 14 of their parents. Responses to interview questions were divided into three categories: 1) General – related to all cases; 2) Typical – more than one-half the cases included the response; and 3) Variant – only two or three cases reported.Five crucial areas related to disclosure were identified:1)      Being believed. Fear of not being believed was the reason most often cited for not disclosing the abuse.2)      Being asked. Respondents often stated that their disclosure was related to “being asked” whether directly, or indirectly. Parents or concerned observers, such as a teacher, often noted a change in behavior and asked if anything were wrong, which encouraged disclosure. In two cases, family members observed sexualized behaviors that were unusual for the victim of the abuse.3)      Shame and self-blame. Almost one-half of the participants reported feeling ashamed or blaming themselves as the reason for not disclosing. Children/adolescents reasoned that it was too embarrassing to tell a parent of the incident. Self-blame also played a role in not disclosing the abuse. In some cases, this self-blame extended beyond the event itself and focused on the consequences of talking about the event, hiding the abuse for fear of what might follow.4)      Fears and Concerns for Self and Others. Fear of the consequences of disclosing their abuse varied among participants, even though most of the fears were unfounded. Included in the responses were fears of the abuser hurting them again, as well as the impact on the family, and/or fear of going through the judicial process.5)      Peer Influence. In this study, peer influence encouraged the young person to disclose to an adult, with 15 of the 22 young people interviewed reporting that they had first disclosed their abuse to a friend or relative before disclosing to a parent.Clinicians who work with children and adolescents should be aware of the following in their practice:Shame and self-blame are issues for children and adolescents who consider disclosing their abuse. Practitioners can diminish the possible negative messages received by young people from people around them by encouraging an atmosphere of trust.Peers play an important role in disclosure, providing support to the victim and encouraging disclosure. Professionals working with victims of abuse can ask about available peer support.Some of the participants noted that “they had never been asked.” Often, just asking will elicit disclosure of CSA.last_img read more

Kiren Rijiju says govt. working on adventure policy

first_imgThe Centre is working on an adventure policy to promote certain destinations as well as activities that make adrenaline surge.India had never had such a policy that could impact sports as well as tourism, Union Sports and Youth Affairs Minister Kiren Rijiju said during the launch of a Thailand airline’s flight between Guwahati and Bangkok.“I have asked officials in my Ministry to draft an adventure policy besides revamping the youth and sports policies. The Northeast will become the focal point in the entire approach,” he said on Sunday.Mr. Rijiju said adventure destinations in the Himalayan and sub-Himalayan swathes of the Northeast could benefit from the policy, provided the region was promoted as a combined package and not in isolation by the constituent States.Arunachal Pradesh, Mr. Rijiju’s home State, is geographically the region’s largest offering adventure sports such as mountaineering, mountain biking, paragliding, rock-climbing and white-water rafting. The other States – Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim and Tripura – too have places ideal for adventure sports.“All State governments in the Northeast must come together for unified tourism policy. Otherwise, the region’s culture and natural assets would remain a potential without being exploited sustainably,” Mr. Rijiju said at the programme to mark the launch of Nok Air’s inaugural flight.Assam Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal flagged off the flight — the first by any foreign airline to and from Guwahati — from the Lokapriya Gopinath Bordoloi International Airport early on Sunday. Mr. Rijiju also warned that the region had to first get out of the culture of shutdowns and blockades to cash in on tourism. Years of insurgency had already had a debilitating effect on the Northeast, he said.last_img read more

Philippines defends basketball title, rips Indonesia for the gold

first_imgBrace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension LIST: Class, gov’t work suspensions during 30th SEA Games FILE – Gilas’ Kiefer Ravena drives against Singapore during their game in the 2017 Southeast Asian Games at MABA Stadium in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. CONTRIBUTED PHOTOKUALA LUMPUR—When all else fails, at least win the basketball gold.While Team Philippines took defeats from several corners, Gilas Pilipinas made sure to pocket the gold that the country craves for the most, drubbing Indonesia, 94-55, for the Southeast Asian Games men’s basketball title Saturday.ADVERTISEMENT Fil-German Christian Standhardinger chipped 11 as he provided muscle underneath when Indonesia was trying to drag the Filipinos to a slow-burn, half court game. SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief LATEST STORIES MOST READ Before an overflow crowd at MABA Stadium, the Philippines, sending its Team B here, claimed its 12th straight SEA Games gold medal in a show of undeniable might.The Philippines has won 18 titles in all having lost the crown just once—in the 1989 edition that was incidentally held in this city.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“It’s a wonderful feeling for me. It’s icing on the cake,” said team captain Kiefer Ravena, who has now won  fourth straight SEA Games titles.The flashy point guard served as the pillar for Gilas, which wasn’t very consistent all tournament long and only played as one cohesive unit in the final. Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses Streaking Ginebra deals Alaska another loss LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games SEA Games: PH’s Alisson Perticheto tops ice skating short program Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. He made seven points aside from providing leadership in the team that was assembled off the pool members who weren’t chosen for the Fiba Asian Cup held the previous week.“Given the chance, I will play for the Philippines once again,” said Ravena referring to the 2019 Games that will be held in Manila.Mike Tolomia topscored with 20 points including five three-pointers as Gilas found its mark early in the match to pull away beyond the reach of the Indonesians.“We shot very well tonight, that’s the key,” said coach Jong Uichico who handled the team even as Chot Reyes, head coach of Gilas’ Team A, arrived in the city Friday.Kobe Paras added 14 points—flashing his highlight-reel moves to the delight the gallery.ADVERTISEMENT PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games PLAY LIST 03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics00:50Trending Articles01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding Read Next View commentslast_img read more

We weren’t allowed to play cricket with boys because culture was different, says Pakistan captain Sana Mir

first_imgAhead of the high-profile encounter against India at the ICC Women’s World Cup, Pakistan women’s team is looking to take inspiration from the men’s team which won the ICC Champions Trophy by beating Virat Kohli’s side in the final last month. India and Pakistan clash on Sunday at Derby.Pakistan women’s cricket has grown over the years however they remain an “unpredictable team” and can spring a “surprise” in any game. Pakistan have not had the best of the start to the Women’s World Cup in England with defeats against South Africa and England in their first two matches.On Sunday the Sana Mir-led team takes on a high-flying Mithali Raj’s girls, who have been in a red hot form with comfortable victories over the favourites England and West Indies.”We were not allowed to play on the roads with the boys because the culture was quite different. People would ask why a girl is playing cricket. In the last five-six years, I have seen massive change in the perception, massive change in the number of girls participating on the streets and in the ground,” Sana Mir told ICC.Sana Mir said Pakistan’s victory at the Champions Trophy is a morale booster.”It’s a morale booster for all Pakistanis. We have been struggling with getting international cricket back home, we have been struggling at big tournaments and I think winning the Champions Trophy is a huge morale booster for the nation and we are all very proud of the way the boys have played,” she said.advertisementPakistan batter Nain Abidi said the whole nation is backing the women’s team and also thanked Pakistan Cricket Board for its help.”The whole nation is now backing us and following us. Lot of people are now aware of women’s cricket. There are lot of people who are following us on social media. We got a lot of messages form the men’s team. They are saying that now it’s yor turn to do it,” Nain Abidi said.”The Pakistan Cricket Board is helping us all the way. Even though we are not winning matches and tournaments, they continue to back us because they know we are talented, skillful and have the potential to o well.In the history of women’s One-Day Internationals (ODI), India have faced Pakistan seven times and won on all occasions.”We were not allowed to play cricket with the boys because the culture was different.”Pakistan, and women’s cricket, has come a long way. pic.twitter.com/ZcGDMK3qR4- ICC (@ICC) July 1, 2017last_img read more

10 months agoBrighton boss Hughton delighted with Arsenal draw

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Brighton boss Hughton delighted with Arsenal drawby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBrighton boss Chris Hughton says they deserved their 1-1 draw with Arsenal.Jurgen Locadia cancelled out Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang’s opener on the south coast, and Albion finished the game strongly, going close on a number of occasions against Unai Emery’s side.Hughton said, “After a difficult start, going 1-0 down against a very good team on the ball, we showed great character to get back into the game.“If there was a team that was going to score in the second half, I felt it was going to be us.“They had more possession because that’s the way they play, but I thought we were a bigger threat to score and Solly [March] probably had the best chance of the game.“But remember these are a team, up until recently, that had gone on a very long run of winning games. You can’t underestimate the quality they’ve got — a draw will always be a very good result.” last_img read more

10 months agoArsenal activate Monreal one-year extension

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Arsenal activate Monreal one-year extensionby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal have reportedly extended Nacho Monreal’s contract until 2020.Monreal, 32, had entered the final year of his contact this season.However, the Gunners have trigged an extension clause that will stretch his current deal for another season, according to ESPN.Talks over a longer extension have been put on hold until the summer.There are a host of Arsenal players who have entered the final six months of their contract, including Aaron Ramsey, Petr Cech and Danny Welbeck. last_img read more