Fans gear up for ‘GameDay’

first_imgStudents will showcase their dedication to Notre Dame football on national television Saturday during filming of ESPN’s “College GameDay.” A pit for 200 students will be located near the commentators, and many fans will camp out the night before to ensure a spot in the crowd.   Senior Kristen Stoutenburgh, executive vice president of Leprechaun Legion, said the group wants as many students as possible to come to the filming. “We want the nation to know that the Legion is the best student section in the country and we’re supporting our team 100 percent,” Stoutenburgh said. “We want a Legion green invasion for ‘GameDay,’ so we want students to come early and wear their green Legion gear.” Leprechaun Legion will sponsor sign making in the JACC Fieldhouse after the pep rally Friday so students can hold up creative posters during the telecast, Stoutenburgh said. The group will also give out free McDonald’s breakfast sandwiches Saturday morning to the first 200 students to show up, she said. “Notre Dame football weekends are special to begin with, but having ‘College GameDay’ on campus adds another level of excitement and energy on campus,” Stoutenburgh said. “We have an awesome opportunity to show the nation that Notre Dame football is back, and the fans couldn’t be more excited about it.” Junior Matt Cunningham, president of Leprechaun Legion, said being featured in “College GameDay” signifies that Notre Dame is a top contender in college football.   “With the national spotlight on Notre Dame, beating Stanford gives us a chance to announce our presence as a legitimate top-10 team,” Cunningham said.   Junior Mark Ambrose said he plans to camp out with friends to be “front and center” for “College GameDay.” “Something like this only comes around once in a while,” Ambrose said. “I remember watching the show as a kid and in high school and always wanting to be a part of the festivities and craziness that goes along with it. It’s really great that they decided to come to ND for once and give us this opportunity.” Ambrose said he doesn’t want to reveal the contents of his sign before the taping, but it pokes fun at “notorious ND haters Mark May and Rick Reilly of ESPN.” Sophomore Conor McCarter said he will hold up a sign that reads, “Even the Lorax won’t save these trees,” referring to the Stanford Tree, a feature of the school’s marching band.   “It bothers me how no one’s heard about Notre Dame,” McCarter said. “I hope [being featured on ‘College GameDay’] can help to make us relevant again.” Junior Ben Finan said bringing College GameDay to Notre Dame calls into question ESPN correspondent Rick Reilly’s pre-season assertion that Notre Dame football is irrelevant. “ESPN just ran the Rick Reilly article about Notre Dame, and for them to then turn around and have his company choose to come here contradicts their highest-paid journalist,” Finan said. “[‘College GameDay’ has] only got 13, 14 appearances a year. Notre Dame’s clearly relevant. It is a benefit because it does say, ‘Notre Dame’s back on the map.’” But Finan said he does not plan to attend the taping because he went the last time “College GameDay” came to Notre Dame for the 2005 game against USC. “I was kind of underwhelmed by the production,” he said. “It was just so many people and very hard to hear and understand what was going on while you were in the crowd, and basically all it is anytime they come back to a commercial or go to a commercial, they show the crowd and you hold up your sign.” Finan said he fears the presence of “College GameDay” on campus will disturb the traditional pre-game atmosphere. “People generally are wandering all around campus,” Finan said. “I feel like this will create a gravitation point of something that will take away from people going to the Grotto and the Basilica, and it will take away from people cooking out on the quad because people are going to be so drawn to this national name of ‘College GameDay’ and going to Library Quad, which is where people already are.” Finan said he is more excited for “Mike and Mike in the Morning” to film on campus Friday. Ambrose said the publicity will make the football weekend better for fans. “I think it’ll add to the overall game atmosphere,” he said. “Obviously with Michigan being a night game, that in itself made it a crazy atmosphere, but with GameDay on campus it’s only going to make the game atmosphere even crazier for this huge game. It also doesn’t hurt to have the nation pay attention to us in light of our undefeated start, [which is] hopefully a good sign that Notre Dame football is indeed back.” While the hype before the game may draw positive attention to Notre Dame, Finan said he fears it may contribute to an unfortunate result. “There’s always a let-down game,” Finan said. “I feel like [because of] the amp up for the Miami game, despite being awesome and playing a great game, we could experience a hangover this weekend, and GameDay is contributing to that.”last_img read more

Scholar connects atheism to cultural shifts

first_imgNoted British literary theorist Terry Eagleton explored the relationship between the postmodern movement, religion, atheism and fundamentalism in his lecture “The Death of God and the War on Terror” on Wednesday at the Eck Visitors Center auditorium. The English department sponsored the event.“Religion has played, traditionally, such a vital role in legitimating political regimes that our rulers could hardly look upon the disappearance of God with any degree of equanimity,” Eagleton said. “Religion is an exceedingly hard act to follow. Indeed it has been proved to be by far the most universal symbolic system humanity has ever known.”  Emmet Farnan | The Observer According to Eagleton, the “death of God” and the shift towards atheism was due largely to evolving ideas of market and capitalist mentality, as well as the influence of postmodernism in Western culture. Eagleton said capitalism and utilitarian market systems, as ideas that do not necessarily involve metaphysical or moral concepts, create a tension with morally-based systems such as democracy.“It was the inherently rationalist, utilitarian, pragmatic, mental logic of the marketplace which has rendered such high-sounding and edifying metaphysical notions as implausible,” Eagleton said.Eagleton said notions of cultural relativism and the importance humans put on the anthropological aspect of culture influence our beliefs.“Culture is as precious as it is because it was seen to offer in a hopelessly divided society a ground of fundamental reconciliation,” he said. “Only religion has been able, I think, on a widespread scale, to link up these two aspects of culture.”According to Eagleton, religion connects the two definitions of culture, an anthropological version and a high art concept, that are key to the human experience. Eagleton said the shift away from God as a central focus of culture has created a new relationship between government and culture and changed the role that relationship plays in understanding humanity.“There is a kind of complicity between cultural customs that becomes deeply involved in political questions,” Eagleton said. “What that means is that culture has become part of the problem, rather than part of the solution”.Eagleton said religious fundamentalism arose as a response to the rapid social movement away from religion as Western civilization developed. He cited events such as the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks and other instances of religious fundamentalism as responses to western capitalism.“Religious fundamentalism is a momentous, historic shift in western civilization,” Eagleton said. “Fundamentalism has its source not so much in hatred as in anxiety. It’s the pathological mind set of those who feel ‘washed up’ by the brave new world of capitalism.”Tags: atheism, capitalism, culture, fundamentalism, religion, Terry Eagletonlast_img read more

Liverpool sign goalkeeper Mignolet

first_img The Belgium international has penned a “long-term” contract at Anfield after passing medical. The 25-year-old has impressed in the North East since arriving from Sint-Truiden in 2010, establishing himself as one of the most promising keepers in Europe. It’s a big club and when you arrive it’s a big thing,” Mignolet told liverpoolfc.com. “I’m very pleased to be here and I’m looking forward to getting started. “The first training [session] will be very early and I’ll be happy to be there. “I think it will be very special the first moment I step onto the pitch.” Mignolet becomes Liverpool’s fourth signing of the summer following Manchester City’s Kolo Toure, Celta Vigo’s Iago Aspas and Sevilla’s Luis Alberto. Manager Brendan Rodgers is keen to get his business done early and he is also tracking Sporting Lisbon defender Tiago Iloris and is interested in Shakhtar Donetsk midfielder Henrikh Mkhitaryan. He is also interested in signing another centre-back to ensure he has enough cover following the retirement of Jamie Carragher. Liverpool have confirmed the signing of goalkeeper Simon Mignolet from Sunderland.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

FAI chief ‘should face questions’

first_img Press Association Members of the Oireachtas sports and tourism committee, which is due to meet on Wednesday, have suggested FAI chief executive Delaney should appear before them to answer a series of questions over the matter, which sparked global headlines last week. Committee chairman, Fine Gael TD John O’Mahony, told the Irish Independent: “There are governance issues arising here and the FAI does receive taxpayers’ funds. This will be considered by the committee members.” Reports of the payment, which was described in the confidentiality agreement between FIFA and the FAI as an “inducement”, initially emerged last year, but it was confirmed for the first time by Delaney and then FIFA last week. The governing body handed over the cash to head off the prospect of legal action over the Republic of Ireland’s heartbreaking 2009 World Cup play-off defeat by France, during which Thierry Henry’s blatant handball during the build-up to the decisive goal was not spotted by the match officials. Another committee member, Labour TD Michael McCarthy, said: “The arrival of five million euros into the FAI coffers in 2010, a time of nationwide financial distress, appears to have gone unremarked. “How was such a large sum of money handled and transferred, and how does it relate to accounting practices generally? These are just some of the questions which arise and the public are entitled to answers. “That is why I believe the FAI should provide the committee with the answers it needs.” The calls echoed that of Sinn Féin TD Dessie Ellis, who said earlier in the week: “It is in the best interests of the FAI and football as a whole that the Oireachtas Committee and Mr Delaney can meet for a frank discussion on this payment rather than allow rumours and doubt to grow over the actions of our national football association on the international stage.” The story overshadowed preparations for Sunday’s historic friendly against England, the first in the city for 20 years, which ultimately unfolded as a drab 0-0 draw. Manager Martin O’Neill did his best to side-step the issue at his pre-match press conference on Saturday, and was equally unforthcoming after the game as he turned his attention to this weekend’s vital Euro 2016 qualifier against Scotland. He said: “I’ll discuss it sometime, okay? I haven’t the time to do it really here. Do you know what? I will when it’s done and dusted. “Absolutely, I’ll just put my seal of approval or disapproval on it. Seriously.” center_img John Delaney could be called before an Irish government committee to explain how FIFA’s controversial five million euro loan to the Football Association of Ireland remained under the radar. last_img read more