Influenza virus can evolve resistance to experimental antiviral drug

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 25 2018The influenza virus can evolve resistance to an anti-flu drug currently in development for use in pandemics but only if there are multiple genetic mutations, a study has found.Scientists at Imperial College London, in collaboration with Public Health England, have discovered that two genetic mutations would be needed for the virus to develop resistance to favipiravir, an experimental antiviral developed in Japan.Favipiravir is not currently licensed in the UK for the treatment of flu but has shown to be effective in clinical trials to date and has the potential to be used in the event of a flu pandemic where other drugs, such as Tamiflu, might fail.The researchers caution that the influenza virus has only so far been shown to develop resistance to the drug in laboratory studies, and it is unclear if the same would happen in a pandemic. However, their findings highlight a mechanism by which influenza and other viruses could potentially overcome such drugs used in the event of an outbreak and so should be closely monitored.It was previously thought that the influenza virus was unable to overcome favipiravir, with laboratory, animal and clinical studies showing little evidence of resistance. However, the latest findings, published this week in the journal PNAS, are the first to show that influenza could develop resistance to the drug.Professor Wendy Barclay, from the Department of Medicine and Action Medical Research Chair in Virology at Imperial, who led the research, said: “We’re alerting the world to the fact that RNA viruses, like influenza, can readily adapt to their environment and evolve, and that while favipiravir could be a potentially important drug in a pandemic situation, resistance can emerge.”Favipiravir acts by targeting an enzyme called RNA polymerase used by influenza to copy its genetic material. Clinical trials have shown the drug to be effective in treating flu in humans and it has also been tested against other RNA viruses, like ebola and chikungunya, which rely on the same type of enzyme to replicate, showing promise in pre-clinical trials.In the latest study, Professor Barclay and colleagues from the NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Respiratory Infections at Imperial explored how influenza might potentially evolve to counter the drug.Related StoriesStudy finds lower risk of Type 1 diabetes in children vaccinated against ‘stomach flu’ virus‘Stomach flu’ vaccine prevents type 1 diabetes in childrenVirus employs powerful strategy to inhibit natural killer cell functionWhen influenza was grown in the presence of favipiravir in cell cultures, the virus was able to evolve, uncovering a combination of two key mutations that enabled it to become resistant to the antiviral.The first of the mutations caused a change in the RNA polymerase enzyme itself, blocking the drug’s effect, but it came at a cost for the virus and affected its ability to reproduce.However, this loss of fitness was countered by the second mutation, which restored the virus’s ability to thrive and spread.According to the researchers, it is unclear whether this combination of mutations could occur readily in viruses in the wild, but their findings are the first to show a clear genetic mechanism by which resistance to the drug could potentially come about in influenza strains around the world.They add that while their work focused on flu, other research groups have reported the same mutation in chikungunya – another RNA virus which uses the same enzyme to replicate – suggesting that there may be a general mechanism by which other RNA viruses could become resistant to the drug.”Favipiravir is still an important drug and should be in the pipeline to be used in the event we need it, but we now know that viruses can develop resistance to it,” explained Professor Barclay. “We need to look out for these mutations and monitor for them, particularly if we are using this drug in outbreak situations and in patients that might have prolonged disease, as those are conditions where you might see resistance emerging.”Dr Maria Zambon, from Public Health England, said: “We have shown that resistance can emerge to this antiviral, which has not been shown previously and we need to factor this in to our pandemic preparedness. However, pandemic planning is multifaceted and includes vaccines, antivirals and good hygiene messaging.”Professor Barclay added: “This research is a great illustration of the success of NIHR Health Protection Research Units. Not only do the findings contribute to the scientific knowledge base, they also make an important contribution to our public health knowledge about how we use these drugs and the importance of surveillance to spot the emergence of such mutations.” Source:http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/last_img read more

International study increases group of lung cancer patients who may benefit from

first_img Source:https://www.cnio.es/en/news/translational-en/an-international-clinical-trial-extends-the-effectiveness-of-immunotherapy-to-more-lung-cancer-patients/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 4 2018The strategy for triggering the patient’s own immune system to attack cancer, immunotherapy, is proving effective for more and more tumor types, although to varying degrees. In lung cancer, immunotherapy had proven to extend survival rates for only some variants of the disease. Now, an international clinical trial led by the oncologist Luis Paz-Ares, head of the Lung Cancer Clinical Research Unit H12O-CNIO at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), which also encompasses professionals from the University Hospital 12 de Octubre, has substantially increased the group of lung cancer patients who may benefit from immunotherapy.The clinical trial focuses on squamous cell carcinoma, in advanced stages of the disease presenting metastasis. The results have been published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) and show that immunotherapy, when administered alongside conventional chemotherapy, “significantly increases” patient survival. For Paz-Ares, this result “offers new possibilities against a subtype of lung cancer in which, over the past two decades, the possibilities of treatment have barely advanced”.Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. In Spain, there were over 22,000 deaths from this type of cancer in 2016 (according to data from the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology, SEOM). Squamous cell carcinoma is a type of so-called non-small-cell lung cancer; it represents between 20% and 30% of all cases of lung cancer and has a worse prognosis than other variants. In addition, it is one of the cancers for which the least amount of progress has been made in terms of treatment, because, unlike in other tumors, in this form of carcinoma, molecular targets have not been identified that would be susceptible to therapeutic exploitation -i.e., molecules essential for tumor development and progression that can be blocked with specific drugs.The results of the new study represent, therefore, a significant step forward. The authors conclude that “in patients with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma, administering the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab along with chemotherapy (…) significantly prolongs overall and progression-free survival,” compared to when only chemotherapy is administered.Related StoriesResearchers use AI to develop early gastric cancer endoscopic diagnosis systemStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryPatients who received chemotherapy and immunotherapy extended their survival by almost 16 months on average, – reducing the risk of death during treatment by 36% – compared to 11.3 months for those who received chemotherapy alone.These results open the door to investigate the effectiveness of immunotherapy in patients during the early stages of the disease – without metastases- when we can prolong survival much more and even attempt to eradicate the disease, explains Paz-Ares.One very important aspect is that the combination of immuno- and chemotherapy was effective in all patients, and not only in those who showed very high levels of the protein PD-L1. Pembrolizumab acts on this protein to revitalize the body’s defense systems against the tumor. In general, this type of immunotherapy in lung cancer had only proved effective in cases where PD-L1 protein is expressed.This study corroborates the results observed in another study conducted in parallel and similar in design, but on patients with advanced non-small-cell carcinoma of non squamous cell carcinoma varieties (for example, adenocarcinoma or large cell carcinoma). In this research, a benefit was also observed when pembrolizumab was administered, which also seemed to encompass all patients, including those affected by tumors without PD-L1 expression.The challenge now, says Paz-Ares, is to find new biomarkers to help predict in which patients immunotherapy might be more effective, and also to understand why many cancers become resistant to this therapy over time. Finally, “Our intention is to find the right immunotherapy strategy for each tumor and patient, alone or in combination,” says the oncologist.last_img read more

Auburn study explains link between habitat loss and global emergence of infectious

first_imgThe field of disease ecology is heavily based on a hypothesis known as the dilution effect, which was released at the turn of this century. It is essentially the idea that biodiversity conservation can protect humans from emerging infectious diseases. Zohdy said the dilution effect highlights the critical role that wildlife conservation can play in protecting human health and has transformed the understanding of zoonotic infectious diseases.Related StoriesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairVirus killing protein could be the real antiviral hero finds studyHowever, until now, even after a wealth of research in the past few decades has explored that hypothesis and found associations between the loss of biodiversity and EIDs, there has been no explanation for where the microbes that cause EIDs come from and how they get to humans.”Through our hypothesis, we propose that as humans alter the landscape through habitat loss, forest fragments act as islands, and the wildlife hosts and disease-causing microbes that live within them undergo rapid diversification,” Zohdy said. “Across a fragmented landscape we would then see an increase in diversity of disease-causing microbes, increasing the probability that any one of these microbes may spill over into human populations, leading to outbreaks.”Oaks said he is encouraged that the research will impact the way these problems are perceived.”Our paper introduces an evolutionary mechanism to explain the association between habitat fragmentation and disease spillover into human populations, which we hope will complement the ecological perspectives on this global health challenge,” he said.School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences Dean Janaki Alavalapati said the paper’s findings are compelling.”Dr. Zohdy and her fellow researchers provide noteworthy insights in the field of emerging infectious diseases and the driving forces behind them,” Alavalapati said. “Their findings could result in a significant shift in the way the origins of these diseases are perceived.” Source:Auburn UniversityJournal reference:Zohdy, S. et al. (2019) The Coevolution Effect as a Driver of Spillover. Trends in Parasitology. doi.org/10.1016/j.pt.2019.03.010. Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 24 2019Auburn University researchers have published a new hypothesis that could provide the foundation for new scientific studies looking into the association of habitat loss and the global emergence of infectious diseases.They present their research in the paper, “The Coevolution Effect as a Driver of Spillover,” in the latest issue of the scientific journal, Trends in Parasitology.”We provide a new perspective about how habitat loss can facilitate the emergence of infectious diseases in humans,” said Sarah Zohdy, assistant professor in the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences and the College of Veterinary Medicine, who coauthored the study with Tonia Schwartz and Jamie Oaks, assistant professors in the Department of Biological Sciences in the College of Sciences and Mathematics.Globally, scientists believe habitat loss is associated with emerging infectious diseases, or EIDs, spreading from wildlife to humans, such as Ebola, West Nile virus, SARS, Marburg virus and others. The Auburn team developed a new hypothesis, the coevolution effect, which is rooted in ecology and evolutionary biology, to explain the underlying mechanisms that drive this association.Schwartz said the team integrated ideas from multiple aspects of biology, including disease ecology, evolutionary biology and landscape genetics, to develop the new hypothesis on why diseases are more likely to spill over from wildlife to humans in deforested habitats. We provide a testable hypothesis that we hope other researchers will try to test with their data, as we will be doing. Whether or not these studies fully support this new hypothesis, we anticipate it will provide a new perspective that other researchers in this field can use and build on, to ultimately push this field forward to understand disease spillover and prevent it.”Tonia Schwartz, assistant professor, Auburn Universitylast_img read more

Deutsche Telekom confident after Q1 profit bump

Fast growth at its US mobile unit should help boost earnings in 2018, Deutsche Telekom said Wednesday Citation: Deutsche Telekom confident after Q1 profit bump (2018, May 9) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-deutsche-telekom-confident-q1-profit.html © 2018 AFP Deutsche Telekom rings up big profits thanks to US tax reform Germany’s Deutsche Telekom lifted its earnings forecast for 2018 on Wednesday as it presented first-quarter results, saying fast growth especially in US arm T-Mobile would juice its operating income. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Net profit at the firm increased 32.8 percent year-on-year between January and March, to 992 million euros ($1.2 billion).The group reported falling revenues, down 3.9 percent at 17.9 billion euros, as currency headwinds from the strong euro clouded the growth picture.Operating, or underlying profit also fell 11.6 percent, to 5.3 billion euros.Nevertheless, “we will remain on course for success in 2018,” chief executive Tim Hoettges said, pointing to Telekom’s “unique” growth and slightly increasing the group’s annual forecast for adjusted operating profit to 23.3 billion euros.In the first quarter, the former state telecoms provider passed a milestone of 10 million German customers connected to the internet via its fibre-optic lines.And Telekom booked continuing growth at carrier T-Mobile US, with 1.4 million net new customers and a double-digit year-on-year increase in adjusted operating profit.But it offered was no new information about its proposed merger of the unit with competitor Sprint, which would combine the third- and fourth-largest mobile operators in America. Analysts and observers fear the tie-up could be blocked by US antitrust regulators. Explore further read more

Leading journalists join call for EU copyright reform

first_img EU Parliament rejects controversial copyright law Explore further © 2018 AFP Leading journalists from more than 20 countries joined a call Tuesday for European MPs to approve a controversial media reform aimed at forcing internet giants to pay for news content. The plans have been firmly opposed by big US tech firms such as Google and Facebook, as well as advocates of internet freedomcenter_img European Parliament lawmakers return in September to discuss the proposal, a first draft of which was rejected last month after a fierce debate.The so-called copyright and neighbouring rights law aims to ensure that producers of creative content—whether news, music or movies—are paid fairly in a digital world.But the plans have been firmly opposed by big US tech firms such as Google and Facebook, as well as advocates of internet freedom.An open letter signed by more than 100 prominent journalists from major news outlets warned Tuesday that “this fleecing of the media of their rightful revenue” was “morally and democratically unjustifiable”.”We have become targets and our reporting missions cost more and more,” said the letter written by AFP foreign correspondent Sammy Ketz and published in several European newspapers including France’s Le Monde.”Yet, even though (the media) pay for the content and send the journalists who will risk their lives to produce a trustworthy, thorough and diverse news service, it is not they who reap the profits but the internet platforms, which help themselves without paying a cent,” the letter said.”It is as if a stranger came along and shamelessly snatched the fruits of your labour.”The editorial urged the European Parliament to “vote massively in favour of neighbouring rights for the survival of democracy and one of its most remarkable symbols: journalism”.Major publishers, including AFP, have pushed for the reform—known as Article 11—seeing it as an urgently needed solution against a backdrop of free online news that has wiped out earnings for traditional media companies.But opponents have called it a “link tax” that will stifle discourse on the Internet.Resistance has been especially heated to Article 13: the proposal to make online platforms legally liable for copyrighted material put on the web by users.Music legend Paul McCartney as well as major music labels and film studios had lobbied politicians urging them to come together and back the changes.Critics, however, argue the reform will lead to blanket censorship by tech platforms that have become an online hub for creativity, especially YouTube.They say it will also restrict the usage of memes and remixes by everyday internet surfers.But the journalists on Tuesday rejected this as a “lie”.”Free access to the web will endure because the internet giants, which now use editorial content for free, can reimburse the media without asking consumers to pay,” the open letter said. Citation: Leading journalists join call for EU copyright reform (2018, August 28) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-08-journalists-eu-copyright-reform.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Navy engineer gets New Years Day patent for dual mode slotted antenna

first_imgIllustration of Tonn’s new antenna. Credit: Troy Carter/TechLink On New Year’s Day, 2019, Navy engineer David A. Tonn received his twenty-eighth U.S. patent, according to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Patent talk: Wireless charging using Wi-Fi routers Titled “Dual Mode Slotted Monopole Antenna,” the novel antenna design could soon be connecting your cell phone to the internet. (U.S. Patent 10,170,841)Slotted antennas are commonly used in telecommunication towers and television broadcast antennas. Unlike a standard antenna, the slots allow the antenna to be pointed in a particular direction. The Navy uses these types of antennas for radar applications and communicating with towed sonar buoys.Until now, slotted cylinder antennas have been limited by what’s called a cutoff frequency, beyond which the antenna effectively shorts out. Tonn’s work has successfully given cylinder slot antennas the ability to also act as a monopole antenna beyond the cutoff frequency by “floating” the antenna above the ground plane with a capacitor.Tonn, an expert in maritime antennas at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center, tested his design using a 12-inch copper prototype, but the patent notes that it “can be scaled to other portions of the RF spectrum, making it useful in the realm of commercial communications, e.g., digital television, cellular telephone service, etc.”Businesses that want to bring the antenna to market can now acquire it by applying for a patent license from the Navy. Under the business-friendly umbrella of technology transfer, patent license agreements allow federal laboratories to assign their intellectual property rights to a business or entrepreneur and facilitate access to inventors and technical data.TechLink, a nonprofit organization that specializes in federal technology transfer, helps companies prepare a commercialization plan and patent license application at no charge. Since 1999, TechLink has helped hundreds of companies, large and small, realize commercial success with federal inventions through the development of new and improved products and services.center_img Explore further Citation: Navy engineer gets New Year’s Day patent for dual mode slotted antenna (2019, January 4) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-navy-year-day-patent-dual.html Provided by TechLinklast_img read more

Joshua Trees Will Be AllButExtinct by 2070 Without Climate Action Study Warns

first_img Of a Feather: Photos Reveal Stunning Birds of the Southwest Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoNucificTop Dr. Reveals The 1 Nutrient Your Gut Must HaveNucificUndoEditorChoice.comSee What The World’s Largest Dog Looks LikeEditorChoice.comUndo Spectacular Geology: Amazing Photos of the American Southwest Desert Mistletoe: Photos of ‘Tree Thieves’ in the American Southwest Joshua trees — some of the most unusual and iconic plants of the American Southwest — have survived as a species for some 2.5 million years in the inhospitable Mojave Desert. Now, they may face imminent extinction due to climate change. In a new study published June 3 in the journal Ecosphere, researchers and volunteer scientists surveyed nearly 4,000 trees in southern California’s Joshua Tree National Park to figure out where the oldest trees tended to thrive during historic periods of extreme heat and drought. (A single Joshua tree can live up to 300 years.) Then, the researchers estimated how much of these Joshua safe zones (or “refugia”) would survive to the end of the century based on a range of climate change predictions. [Desert Green: Images of Joshua Tree National Park] The study authors found that, if greenhouse gas emissions are seriously curbed and summer temperatures are limited to an increase of 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit (3 degrees Celsius), about 19% of the park’s Joshua tree habitat would survive after the year 2070.Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65953-climate-change-destroying-joshua-trees.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  If no action is taken to reduce carbon emissions and summer temperatures rise by 9 F (5 C) or more, however, only 0.02% of the tree’s habitat would survive to the end of the century — leaving the rare tree a hair away from extinction. “The fate of these unusual, amazing trees is in all of our hands,” lead study author Lynn Sweet, a plant ecologist at the University of California, Riverside said in a statement. “Their numbers will decline, but how much depends on us.” Survivors in the sand Joshua Tree National Park covers 1,200 square miles (3,200 square kilometers) of sandy, hilly terrain in the desert between Los Angeles, Las Vegas and Arizona. The spiny-armed Joshua trees have survived millions of years of climate ups and downs by holding on to large amounts of water to carry them through the region’s harshest droughts. However, the study authors wrote, young Joshua trees and seedlings aren’t able to store enough water to weather these dry spells. During long droughts — such as the epic, 376-week-long one that lasted from December 2011 to March 2019 in California — various parts of the park became too parched to support young Joshua tree growth, preventing the species from reproducing properly. As global temperatures rise, more and longer droughts are expected to occur around the world, and that means fewer and fewer new Joshua trees surviving to adulthood. To find out which parts of the tree’s desert habitat were safest and which were most at risk of drying up, a team of park researchers and volunteers counted thousands of trees in various parts of the park, noting each tree’s height (which helped predict the tree’s age) and the number of new sprouts in the area. They found that, in general, trees growing in higher-elevation spots, which tend to be cooler and retain more moisture, survived much better than those in lower, drier regions. The team compared these survey results with historic climate records to predict how much of the Joshua tree’s habitat was likely to shrink as temperatures rise and rainfall decreases over the rest of the century. Under the best-case scenario, they found, just 1 in 5 Joshua trees will survive the next 50 years. Taking swift action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is the only way to save the Joshua trees from extinction, the researchers found. However, even trees in the best-hydrated habitats will still face a serious threat from wildfires, which have also been occurring with greater frequency and intensity as the climate warms, they said. According to the researchers, fewer than 10% of Joshua trees survive when wildfires rush through their habitats — thanks, in part, to car exhaust coating desert shrubs with flammable nitrogen. This, at least, is a threat that can be addressed on a local level, right now. “Fires are just as much a threat to the trees as climate change, and removing grasses is a way park rangers are helping to protect the area today,” Sweet said. “By protecting the trees, they’re protecting a host of other native insects and animals that depend on them as well.”last_img read more

the Tang Dynasty in the sieve critical risk is next to risk

first_imgThe Tang Dynasty the sieve is commonly through changingShanghai noble baby communicates an area Hormone of sexual gland of the armour in serum of check pregnant woman fetal albumen, downy hurried and dissociate are female the chroma of 3 alcohol will judge fetal whether to contract Tang syndrome, judge namely fetal whether to suffer from congenital I model, the risk factor of blemish of divine be in charge of. Tang sieve checks critical risk to belong to critical value risk, the specification has certain sicken odds, but it is fetal and certain to be not represented contract Tang syndrome, soShanghai night netShanghai noble baby General the Tang Dynasty the meeting that the sieve is critical risk suggests to do amniotic fluid punctureLove Shanghai is opposite with the city touch Tactics will decide fetal development case further. Not all pregnant woman does not have familial heredity Tang can contract Tang syndrome with respect to scarcely, and cannot effect a radical cure on medicine of Tang syndrome heretofore this disease, so, want to control Tang to ask for what the measure that produce basically depends on preventing or reduce a little patient integratedly to be born. But need is clear is, sifting the end that examine is not to diagnose some to plant disease, choose however have the person with some disease older possibility. Tang sieve is checked in the light of the specific crowd that hints without any corresponding diseases (like all pregnant woman crowds) , will suffer from the Gao Wei crowd with Tang syndrome larger possibility to be chosen among them through the examination, in order to undertake ever since diagnostic sex examination. The person does not understand the Tang Dynasty what is what the critical risk in the sieve points to, what we see below is Tang sieve in checking critical risk. Why to want to do Tang sieve to check The Tang Dynasty in the sieve critical risk This one examination can be ignored in current society or the multitude that have a lot of, think oneself are familial do not have such case of illness and feel to be able to give birth to Tang from personal scarcely, this is very irresponsible practice, will tell from medical angle, any outside element causes fetal a priori likely I perhaps appear the danger of blemish of divine be in charge of, so Tang sieve is checked1000 beautiful nets of Shanghai make friend Very be necessary, nip in the bud, not when the intelligence that darling just discovers after baby is born is lower than average person regretful.last_img read more

Malaysias IPI advances 4 in May

first_img Related News Tags / Keywords: Economy Business News 11 Jun 2019 April industrial output exceeds forecast Economy 12 Jun 2019 April industrial output expands at faster pace Economy 10 May 2019 March industrial production index exceeds forecastcenter_img {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} Related News KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia’s industrial production index in May rose 4% year-on-year which was above the Bloomberg survey of 3.5%, underpinned by electricity, manufacturing and mining. The Statistics Department said in a statement yesterday the growth was driven by the increase in all indices: electricity (5.7%), manufacturing (4.2%) and Mining (3.0%).“The manufacturing sector output rose by 4.2% in May 2019 as compared to May 2018 after recording a growth of 4.3% in April 2019,” it said. The department said major sub-sectors contributing to the increase in May 2019 were transport equipment and other manufactures products (6.9%), electrical and electronics products (3.7%) and petroleum, chemical, rubber and plastic products (3.2%).It said the output of mining sector increased by 3% from a year ago, which is the highest growth since September 2017.It pointed out the growth was contributed by the natural gas index expanded by 7.6% while the crude oil index fell by 2%. As for the electricity sector, its output increased by 5.7% in May 2019 from a year ago.last_img read more

Chhattisgarh Man fined ordered to throw feast for marrying off son at

first_imgChhattisgarh: Man fined, ordered to throw feast for marrying off son at Arya Samaj templeRamesh Kumar married off his son to a woman of his community at an Arya Samaj temple due to poverty.advertisement India Today Web Desk New DelhiJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 00:22 IST Ramesh Kumar said that a few people of his community ill-treated him as they were not happy with the wedding. (Photo: ANI)A man in Mahasamund district of Chhattisgarh was imposed a fine and ordered to organise a feast by a few people of his community after he married off his son at an Arya Samaj temple. The man, identified as Ramesh Kumar of Tumgaon village, belongs to Dhobi community.Ramesh Kumar married off his son to a woman of his community at an Arya Samaj temple due to poverty. He later filed a complaint after a few people from his community harassed him.In his complaint, Ramesh Kumar said that a few people of his community ill-treated him as they were not happy with the wedding. The victim has alleged that he was boycotted from his reason for the same reason.Santosh Singh, SP Mahasamund, said, “Ramesh Kumar from Tumgaon filed a complaint that a few people of his community ill-treated him as they were not happy with the wedding. They fined him and he was boycotted as well.”An FIR has been registered in connection with the case and an investigation is underway.Also Read | Unity march in Hauz Qazi as temple gets new statuesAlso Read | Make law that allows having only 2 children: Giriraj SinghFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byChanchal Chauhan Nextlast_img read more