South Africa in the Washington Post

first_imgThe supplement, titled South Africa Now, was included in the 6 October 2010 edition of the newspaper. It features contributions by Professor Anton Harber, Caxton chair of journalism at Wits University, veteran journalists Simon Barber and John Battersby, AngloGold Ashanti CEO Mark Cutifani, South African Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe, US ambassador to South Africa Donald Gips, Jann Turner, the director of hit South African movie White Wedding, and Miller Matola, CEO of the International Marketing Council of South Africa.Barber, who is also the Washington-based US country manager for Brand South Africa, commissioned Big Media to produce South Africa Now, and edited it in collaboration with Mary Alexander, the former editor of MediaClubSouthAfrica.com.“With my background as a journalist, I have tended to question the value of supplements like these, figuring they would mostly go unread and land up on the bottom of birdcages,” said Barber.“Recently, however, Bric nations such as Russia and China started doing supplements in the Washington Post that were actually interesting to read, so I began to have second thoughts. What clinched the deal for me was knowing I could enlist the talents of Big Media’s writers, editors and designers.“I was confident we could put something together something that was truly reflective of Brand South Africa and which would get read not just by Washington decision makers but by the captains of global finance who would be in Washington for the IMF/World Bank annual meetings when we published.”Printed in full colour, South Africa Now features photography from the MediaClubSouthAfrica.com image library as well as a stunning American-style op-ed illustration by multi-award-winning South African graphic journalist Francois Smit.It was designed by Irwin Manoim, Big Media’s creative director. A newspaper production and design expert with 30 years in the industry, Manoim is a joint founder and former editor of the Mail & Guardian and of the pioneering internet venture, the electronic Mail & Guardian.“The message of South Africa Now is that South Africa matters, that it’s a country of smart, creative people who have their own ways of doing things and who are making a difference globally,” said Barber.The supplement leads with an exploration of South Africa’s ambitious efforts to balance a growing economy with the need to curb greenhouse-gas emissions, with the most recent example being plans for a huge, US$21-billion, 5,000 megawatt solar park and a smaller solar installation on the island where Nelson Mandela was once jailed.The front page also features a look at Soweto, a book by Jodie Bieber, the South African photographer now most famous for the now-iconic and shocking Time magazine cover featuring the mutilated face of 18-year-old Afghani girl Aisha.Elsewhere in the supplement Motlanthe looks at Africa’s place in the new economic world order. Harber discusses media freedom in South Africa, Matola reports on efforts to fix Africa’s brand, and Turner writes about the “normal, crazy, mixed-up country” that inspired White Wedding.Want to read more? Download South Africa Now in PDF format (2.2 MB).last_img read more

What Encourages Disclosure of Childhood Sexual Abuse?

first_imgReferences[1] McElvaney, R.,  Greene, S. & Hogan, D. (2014). To tell or not to tell? Factors influencing young people’s informal disclosures of child sexual abuse. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 29(5), 928-947. doi: 10.1177/0886260513506281This post was written by Jay Morse & Heidi Radunovich, PhD, members of the MFLN Family Development (FD) team which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn. Jay Morse and Heidi Radunovich, PhDVictims of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) often struggle with whether or not to tell anyone about their sexual abuse, and sometimes delay disclosure for years, if they disclose at all. But what can be done to increase the likelihood of disclosing CSA? In a recent qualitative study in Ireland, McElvaney, Greene, and Hogan (2014) examined informal disclosure of CSA, considering events leading up to, during, and following disclosure.[Flickr, Sad by U.S. Fotografle, CC BY-ND 2.0] Retrieved on September 17, 2015The researchers interviewed 22 children and adolescents, and 14 of their parents. Responses to interview questions were divided into three categories: 1) General – related to all cases; 2) Typical – more than one-half the cases included the response; and 3) Variant – only two or three cases reported.Five crucial areas related to disclosure were identified:1)      Being believed. Fear of not being believed was the reason most often cited for not disclosing the abuse.2)      Being asked. Respondents often stated that their disclosure was related to “being asked” whether directly, or indirectly. Parents or concerned observers, such as a teacher, often noted a change in behavior and asked if anything were wrong, which encouraged disclosure. In two cases, family members observed sexualized behaviors that were unusual for the victim of the abuse.3)      Shame and self-blame. Almost one-half of the participants reported feeling ashamed or blaming themselves as the reason for not disclosing. Children/adolescents reasoned that it was too embarrassing to tell a parent of the incident. Self-blame also played a role in not disclosing the abuse. In some cases, this self-blame extended beyond the event itself and focused on the consequences of talking about the event, hiding the abuse for fear of what might follow.4)      Fears and Concerns for Self and Others. Fear of the consequences of disclosing their abuse varied among participants, even though most of the fears were unfounded. Included in the responses were fears of the abuser hurting them again, as well as the impact on the family, and/or fear of going through the judicial process.5)      Peer Influence. In this study, peer influence encouraged the young person to disclose to an adult, with 15 of the 22 young people interviewed reporting that they had first disclosed their abuse to a friend or relative before disclosing to a parent.Clinicians who work with children and adolescents should be aware of the following in their practice:Shame and self-blame are issues for children and adolescents who consider disclosing their abuse. Practitioners can diminish the possible negative messages received by young people from people around them by encouraging an atmosphere of trust.Peers play an important role in disclosure, providing support to the victim and encouraging disclosure. Professionals working with victims of abuse can ask about available peer support.Some of the participants noted that “they had never been asked.” Often, just asking will elicit disclosure of CSA.last_img read more