What Explains The Carolina Panthers Rise

Denver111138+26 PASS DEFENSE Washington6591+26 But perhaps the most overlooked factor that explains Carolina’s rise is that they weren’t in a terrible place to begin with. Although they went 7-8-1 a year ago, giving them one of the worst records of any playoff team ever, they still finished the season with a solid 1,551 Elo rating3Implying that they had roughly the true talent of a 9-win team. and were projected by Elo to win 9.2 games before the season started. (Yes, playing in the NFC South helps, too.) Based strictly on preseason numbers, there was a 2.9 percent probability that the Panthers would improve their Elo rating as much as they have — making their surge more likely than the Elo improvements of either the Patriots (2.6 percent) or Bengals (1.1 percent).Carolina still represents an unlikely success story, particularly because of how the team has achieved its undefeated record. But while its 8-0 record is surprising, the fact that Carolina is good isn’t. Elo is optimistic about the Panthers’ chances — according to our simulations, only New England has a better chance of winning the Super Bowl. Atlanta82103+21 Oakland7990+12 Tennessee84101+17 When the Denver Broncos fell to the Indianapolis Colts on Sunday, just three teams remained undefeated in the 2015 NFL season: the New England Patriots, Cincinnati Bengals and Carolina Panthers.For the Patriots, starting a season 8-0 is old hat; they also did it in 2007, the year they navigated an entire (regular!) season without a loss. And although the Bengals hadn’t started a season 7-1 or better since 1988, they also had the league’s sixth-best record in the four seasons leading up to this year — they weren’t exactly strangers to the top of the standings.Only Carolina, who was essentially a .500 club over the preceding four years (and worse than that last year) seems to have taken the NFL completely by surprise. Based on our preseason Elo ratings — FiveThirtyEight’s favorite system for estimating an NFL team’s skill level at a given moment — there was a 1.8 percent probability that the Panthers would be 8-0 through Week 9. By contrast, New England had a 6.6 percent probability of being unbeaten at this stage.The Panthers have improved their rating by 116 Elo points (the equivalent of 4.6 points of per-game scoring margin) since the start of the season, and, according to our simulations, they’re on track to win 4.6 more games than was projected before the year. That’s an unusually big jump. But the manner in which Carolina has improved is also unconventional. While the typical big first-half Elo gainer1Which I’m defining as a team that tacks at least 100 points onto its Elo rating through Week 9. does it with a significantly improved passing game, the Panthers’ aerial attack is virtually the same as it was last season — league average, basically, in the eyes of expected points added (EPA).2Using TruMedia data.Although quarterback Cam Newton gets the headlines for the Panthers’ offense, which has improved its overall EPA by about half a standard deviation since last year, almost all of the change is owed to a more efficient rushing game. (Newton himself is on pace for about the same production in the rushing game as last season.) Of all the teams who improved their Elo as much as the Panthers have, only about 14 percent did so with a passing attack that, like Carolina’s, didn’t improve relative to the league. Generally speaking, to win more games in the NFL, you need to throw the ball more effectively.That is, unless you improve your pass defense — which is exactly what the Panthers have done this year. Using the EPA grades I introduced last week, which rate teams on a scale in which 100 is average and one standard deviation is 15 points, only four defenses have improved more against the pass than Carolina’s has this season: TEAM20142015Δ GRADE N.Y. Jets89113+24 Carolina102125+23 Philadelphia97120+23 Pittsburgh8798+11 St. Louis105123+18 read more

Zion Williamson Is The Best College Basketball Player In At Least A

DraftPlayerSchoolOverall Off.TransitionHalf-Court 2009B. GriffinOklahoma948892 2013A. BennettUNLV979394 2014A. WigginsKansas778568 2015K. TownsKentucky9610094 2016B. SimmonsLSU806674 2018D. AytonArizona989398 2007G. OdenOhio State889487 ?Z. WilliamsonDuke95%93%91% 2008D. RoseMemphis766275 2010J. WallKentucky635648 2012A. DavisKentucky999499 Points Per Poss. Percentile Ten games into what will almost certainly be his lone season in Durham, Duke’s Zion Williamson has treated college basketball like a rim on a breakaway. Which is to say, he has left it trembling.On game days, the anointed freshman effectively has a residency on “SportsCenter,” his highlights the fantasy-come-true of any sports-radio personality or TV show producer. Need to fill time? Just discuss the comical absurdity of an 18-year-old throwing down midgame windmills with ease or opine that he’d be unable to handle the scrutiny if the Cleveland Cavaliers were to select him in the NBA draft.Duke head coach Mike Krzyzewski shepherded in one of the most heralded recruiting classes of the modern era this summer, an embarrassment of riches featuring the top three prospects in the country. Unsurprisingly, the Blue Devils rank among the top teams in the nation, their lone loss coming against the veteran-laden Gonzaga Bulldogs in Maui. RJ Barrett, the consensus top-ranked player from the 2018 class, leads the Atlantic Coast Conference in scoring. Yet it’s Williamson who most often elicits the shock-and-awe moments that keep Instagram’s highlight-reel accounts fully stocked. It’s Williamson who draws comparisons — again and again and again — to the incomparable LeBron James. It’s Williamson who is appointment television.1Five of Duke’s next six games will be televised by the ESPN network.That’s because college basketball has never seen a player like him.With a 6-foot-7, 285-pound frame, Williamson looks more like a linebacker than he does a forward. The Wall Street Journal, with the help of a university physicist, found that attempting to draw a charge on Williamson is akin to colliding head-on with a Jeep. Among all active players in the NBA, only Boban Marjanovic outweighs him. And at 7-foot-3, Marjanovic is more than half a foot taller than Williamson. The build of the former South Carolina Mr. Basketball is certainly unorthodox.At Duke’s practice combine, Williamson’s vertical leap exceeded 40 inches. He corrals rebounds and defends the paint with the unadulterated violence of a center, runs the floor with the fluidity of a modern wing, possesses touch with both hands and has a shooting stroke that stretches to the perimeter. Relative to his size, Williamson’s athleticism doesn’t compute. He’s the Refrigerator Perry of the hardwood.In the one-and-done era of college basketball, Duke is no stranger to dominant freshman — players like Jahlil Okafor, Jabari Parker and Jayson Tatum. But what Williamson is doing in his first year at this level is downright historic for any player, let alone a freshman.One way we can assess a player’s contributions to his team is Box Plus/Minus, a metric that estimates the number of points per 100 possessions a player contributes above (or below) average using stats found in the box score. BPM has never seen a college player like Williamson. Among players who qualified for the points per game leaderboard at Sports-Reference.com and appeared in at least 10 games since 2010, the first year for which data for all players is available, Williamson’s mark of +20.4 ranks first among 25,793 individual seasons.Another way to evaluate a player’s contributions is using player efficiency rating. Williamson’s PER of 41.9 is the best mark by any player who saw action in at least 10 games since 2009, the earliest year for the data. Source: Synergy Sports It happens that Williamson is emerging at a moment in which the NBA is putting a premium on positionless players. A decade ago, Williamson might have been relegated to the post, his skill set withering away against taller opponents on the blocks. However, Krzyzewski doesn’t need to shoehorn Williamson in anywhere; ostensibly, he has free reign to roam the backside of the defense like a safety and run the floor in search of rims to pulverize.On one of the nation’s deadliest offenses, Williamson is likely the team’s most versatile player, dropping in a team-best 1.18 points per possession,2Among players with at least 11 possessions according to data provided by Synergy Sports. Because of his size and speed, Williamson has been a nightmare to defend in transition, where he contributes a team-best 1.48 points per possession.3Among players with at least 10 possessions. It doesn’t get any easier for the opposition in the half court, where he ranks in the 91st percentile in scoring.Fronting Williamson in isolation is a fool’s errand. He pours in 1.31 points per possession in those situations, good enough to rank in the 95th percentile nationally, with an adjusted field-goal percentage of 70 percent. Factor in his uncanny court vision and passing abilities, and the equation gets scarier. On isolation plays that include passes, Williamson is scoring 1.37 points per possession, which ranks in the 96th percentile.Allow him to find a spot on the interior of the defense, and you’re asking for more problems. Williamson scores a team-best 1.14 points per possession on post-ups, which ranks in the 89th percentile. When the opposing defense doesn’t send an additional defender, Williamson scores a robust 1.44 points per possession, which ranks in the 99th percentile.Williamson is adept at setting a pick in a pick-and-roll set, but he can also run it. On six pick-and-roll possessions as the ball handler, he scored 10 points.Defensively, Williamson is more than serviceable. As the primary defender, he allows 0.72 points per possession, which ranks in the 73rd percentile. Duke’s defense has improved considerably from a year ago, when Krzyzewski was so fed up with the team’s performance that he instituted a zone defense. This season, the Blue Devils are playing a zone base on just 3 percent of minutes and rank in the 97th percentile in points allowed per possession. Some of that certainly is attributable to the switchable Williamson, who averages two blocks and two steals per contest.His numbers already stack up well against the last five players to go No. 1 in the draft — and many draft projections indeed suggest he’ll go first overall. 2011K. IrvingDuke999098 2017M. FultzWashington715270 Williamson is averaging 20.4 points and 9.0 rebounds per contest, with a true-shooting percentage of 67.5. Only three other players since 1992 have hit those benchmarks, and each was an upperclassmen. And let’s not forget to factor his defense into the comparisons: No player in the past 25 years has averaged 20 points, eight rebounds, two blocks and two steals per contest. But that’s where Williamson is.At its roots, basketball is a sport largely defined by the exploitation of mismatches. Williamson is a mismatch for virtually every player tasked with defending him, and he’s putting up numbers that haven’t been seen in at least a quarter-century. Williamson garnered a reputation as a high flyer by punishing rims and opponents at the high school level, but his first — and likely only — season at the college level has revealed a more polished game that extends to every area of the court, not just above the rim. Zion sure looks like a No. 1 overall pickHow Williamson’s scoring prowess compares with previous top NBA draft picks based on their national percentile rank in points per possession read more

Ohio State baseball carries nohitter into extras but swept by Maryland in

Junior left fielder Ronnie Dawson (4) takes a swing during a game against Bethune-Cookman.Credit: Giustino Bovenzi | Lantern reporterOhio State senior pitcher John Havird couldn’t have pitched much better than he did Friday in the second game of the day against Maryland, but a costly late error tied the game, and the Buckeyes would eventually fall 2-1 in the bottom of the 10th inning. Havird threw a career-high eight innings, allowing no hits and striking out seven, but after hitting his second batter during the first at-bat in the bottom of the ninth, the senior was pulled. Senior left-handed reliever Michael Horejsei retired his only batter on a pop fly, but the struggles immediately began after redshirt sophomore closer Yianni Pavlopoulos took to the mound.After a groundout to short, Pavlopoulos struck out Maryland junior designated hitter Nick Cieri, but Cieri reached first on the wild pitch. Sophomore first baseman Kevin Biondic then hit a hard groundball to third baseman Nick Sergakis. The senior could not come up with the ball cleanly and airmailed the throw to first into the stands, scoring the runner from third.With one out in the bottom of the 10th inning, sophomore center fielder Zach Jancarski singled up the middle for the first Maryland hit of the game. He would later steal second base and score off another single up the middle by junior right fielder Madison Nickens to give the Terrapins the 2-1 win.The game was scoreless until the bottom of the seventh inning when OSU freshman designated hitter Brady Cherry lifted a sacrifice fly to left field, scoring Sergakis. With the way Havird was pitching, the 1-0 lead seemed like it might have been enough to come out victorious, but the rally erased the lefty’s third win of the year. Game 1The first game of the doubleheader on Friday saw Maryland take an early two-run lead and keep OSU off the board to win by a final score of 3-0.After the Buckeyes went down in order to lead off the first inning, Nickens led off the bottom of the first with a walk. Freshman second baseman Nick Dunn singled to follow the free pass, and both runners would advance a base after an error by OSU senior shortstop Craig Nennig. After a strikeout, Cieri singled to left, scoring Nickens. A passed ball by OSU junior catcher Jalen Washington would score the Terrapins’ second run of the inning.The following four innings saw the score remain at 2-0 until Maryland freshman left fielder Marty Costes hit a solo home run to center field. Both starters pitched complete games in the matinee. OSU junior starting pitcher Tanner Tully went eight innings, surrendering three runs (two earned) on three hits, two walks and eight strikeouts. His counterpart, Maryland sophomore Taylor Bloom, tossed nine innings of shutout baseball, allowing only three hits and one walk while striking out five. With rain and snow looming, the Buckeyes and Terrapins will take a day off Saturday, with plans to finish out the series Sunday. The finale is scheduled to take place at 1 p.m. with junior right-hander Mike Shawaryn set to take the bump for Maryland and redshirt sophomore Adam Niemeyer starting for OSU. read more

Jackets brush aside blame aim for lateseason run

Nobody likes excuses.When you are paying an average of $84 a ticket for a product that is ultimately judged on wins and losses, the last thing you want to hear is more cliché coach-speak about a “young team on the verge.”The Blue Jackets have seemingly been a “young team on the verge” for all 10 years of their existence. When does all that potential give way to production? Production, of course, is measured in playoff victories and the possibility of an eventual Stanley Cup championship.It appeared as though the answer had come last season. The Blue Jackets made the postseason for the first time in franchise history, and a single playoff victory would have gone a long way toward erasing the futility of the previous eight seasons.But one of the NHL’s “Original Six,” Columbus’ archrival Detroit Red Wings, erased those hopes with a four-game sweep of the hometown heroes. Being unceremoniously swept from the playoffs without even putting up much of a fight left a bad taste in the mouths of Jackets fans; quite the opposite of building hope for the future.To the informed, however, it still seemed a step in the right direction. In light of this season’s struggles, it now appears that the old adage applies: One step forward, two steps back.So without relying on tired excuses, what has changed?“This is a league that you don’t miss steps in. You might miss them early, but you always have to catch up,” Columbus coach Ken Hitchcock said of his team’s development from last year. “That’s what has happened with a lot of our young guys last year.”What the coach appears to be saying is that his young team overachieved in its run to the playoffs.Now that this year’s team is starting to show signs of life, Hitchcock’s plan to stick with his younger players appears to be paying off. After having gone 3-14-7 during a 24-game stretch, Columbus is now 7-5-0 over the last 12.His “gut decision” to go with a struggling Steve Mason in a recent game against Nashville is an indication that he has a plan and is sticking to it, for good or bad.The same can be said of his continued faith in other Jackets youngsters like Jakub Voracek and Derick Brassard.Many voices around the organization have speculated that a stint down in Syracuse, the Blue Jackets’ minor-league affiliate, would prove beneficial to Mason.Hitchcock disagrees.“Everybody you talk to, when a young goalie [struggles] like this, it’s finish the season, press the reset button and start over next year,” Hitchcock said of his young net-minder. “Every good goalie has gone through this: [Ed] Belfour, [Tom] Barasso, Curtis Joseph. We can’t afford reset here.”With the Olympic break looming, and a favorable schedule which finds the Jackets playing eight of 10 games at home, Hitchcock is optimistic that the playoffs are still very much a reality.“We’ve got to find a way to go 8-2 before the break to stay in the race,” Hitchcock said. “If we go 8-2, who knows how far we can take this thing.” read more

No return for Turner Buckeye guard to skip senior season for NBA

Ohio State guard Evan Turner announced Wednesday that he will forgo his senior season and enter the NBA Draft.“I was blessed with this decision,” Turner said, his voice quivering. “I have a great opportunity and I’m going to turn a leaf over and go on to the next stage of my life.”Turner’s choice stemmed from the realization of his dream to play professionally, he said.“Ever since I was a little kid, I had a dream to play basketball and play in the NBA,” Turner said in the auxiliary gym at the Schottenstein Center. “Right now, I have the opportunity where my dream is realized. … I’m going to forgo my senior season and go to the NBA. It’s a dream come true and I definitely want to thank Coach [Thad] Matta.”Turner’s departure didn’t exactly come out of left field, but the soft-spoken point guard said the decision has tortured him since OSU’s season came to an end.“The past few weeks have been really hard for me,” he said. “I’ve been agonizing over my decision due to the simple fact of how much I love The Ohio State University. I love being a Buckeye. I love my coaching staff and being a kid and the opportunity to just do everything I always dreamed of.”Turner said he made the decision late Tuesday night and told some of his teammates just before he announced his decision to the media Wednesday.“This is the toughest thing I’ve ever had to do,” Turner said. “If I could, I’d really just disappear.”Throughout the season, Turner maintained his intention to remain in school until he felt comfortable with the legacy he was leaving behind. He led the Buckeyes to the Sweet 16 and earned Big Ten and National Player of the Year honors.The Chicago native has been widely projected as a top-three pick in June’s NBA Draft. He averaged 20.4 points, 9.2 rebounds and 6.0 assists per game in his third season with the Buckeyes.Turner’s season didn’t go unblemished, however. He fractured a pair of vertebrae in his back after a nasty fall on a breakaway dunk in a Dec. 5 win over Eastern Michigan. After doctors initially diagnosed an eight-week timetable for his return, Turner made his way back onto the court just five weeks later. He said the risk of another serious injury played a small part in his choice to jump to the next level.His departure leaves the Buckeyes without their leader for next season, when OSU adds one of the nation’s top recruiting classes. Although Turner stressed how he has “two feet in” his decision to enter the NBA Draft, the 6-foot-7 guard said he was satisfied with the state of the OSU program, even without him.“I was in a win-win situation regardless. … If I one day woke up and didn’t have the opportunity to play in the NBA, then my dream and taking care of my family and stuff like that, and I was heartbroken, then that pretty much says you need to go. It’s definitely a great step, and I had great times here, but I’m leaving the program in great hands.”Still, Turner will be leaving behind a close-knit unit that spent plenty of time together on and off the court.“[There have been] a lot of great times, and I’m just thankful I was fortunate enough to be a part of something like this,” Turner said. “My teammates were always great. They helped mold me into who I am. My coaches helped mold me. I’m just lucky to be in the position I’m in and to have the past experiences I’ve had.”As for the legacy that the Naismith winner will leave behind in Columbus, Turner left it to everyone else to decide.“I can’t really say. That’s what the writers are for,” Turner said. “People that watched me play, people I had encounters with, they pretty much build your legacy. You don’t build your own legacy, so we’ll see in 10 to 15 years.” read more

Purdues JaJuan Johnson beats out Ohio States Jared Sullinger for Big Ten

Two days after missing out on the opportunity to earn a share of the Big Ten title, Purdue senior forward JaJuan Johnson learned that he won’t walk away from this season without any hardware in hand, as he was named the Big Ten Player of the Year for the 2010-11 season on Monday night. The senior forward beat out Ohio State freshman forward Jared Sullinger, who appeared to have a lock on the award for the first three months of the season, before seeing stat lines decline in February. Sullinger won four Big Ten Player of the Week awards this season. Johnson finished the regular season as the Big Ten’s leader in scoring and blocks, with averages of 20.5 points and 2.4 blocks per game. He was also the conferences’ No. 4 leading rebounder, pulling down 8.1 rebounds per game. A native of Indianapolis, Ind., Johnson’s top scoring performance came in Purdue’s Dec. 18 win over Indiana State, however his best all-around performance came in the Boilermakers’ Feb. 27 win over Michigan State, when he scored 20 points, and posted season-highs in rebounding and blocks, with 17 and seven, respectively. In winning the award, which has been given out annually since the 1984-85 season, Johnson becomes the third Boilermaker to be named the Big Ten’s top player, joining past award winners from Purdue in Steve Scheffler (1989-90), and Glenn Robinson (1993-94). In addition to winning the Big Ten’s Player of the Year award, Johnson was an all-conference first team selection, and was named the Big Ten’s Player of the Week on Feb. 28. After finishing the regular season with a record of 25-6 (14-4 Big Ten), good for second place in the conference behind OSU, the Boilermakers will attempt to win the Big Ten Tournament in Johnson’s hometown of Indianapolis. Purdue has a bye in the first round of the tournament, and will face the winner of Thursday’s match-up between Michigan State and Iowa on Friday. read more

Ohio State mens soccer defeats Bowling Green in overtime

The Ohio State men’s soccer team needed more than 90 minutes to defeat Bowling Green, but the Buckeyes eventually got the job done. Ten days after defeating Michigan in overtime, OSU took the Falcons to an extra session on Wednesday night and won, 1-0 on freshman midfielder Brady Wahl’s first career goal. Wahl took a long throw-in from freshman midfielder Adam Gorski and buried it in the back of the net in the fourth minute of overtime to pull out the victory. “We had that trailing run all night,” Wahl said. “We were bound to get one and we did. It was a good ball by Gorski.” “Everytime we get one of those long throw-ins with Gorski you think we’re gonna get an opportunity out of it,” said head coach John Bluem. “It’s just dangerous. It doesn’t surprise me that, finally, a chance fell to one of our guys.” The match showcased stellar performances by both teams’ goalkeepers. OSU (7-4-1) junior keeper Matt Lampson had 5 saves, including a big stop with 20 seconds left in regulation. BGSU (7-3-1) redshirt senior keeper Miguel Roasales had 8 saves after replacing an injured Michael Wiest early in the first half. The Buckeyes had two near misses in the first half of action, with the first coming in the 27th minute when a header into the net by junior midfielder Sebastian Rivas was disallowed by an offsides call. Nine minutes later, a Gorski throw-in was headed by junior defender Ben Killian toward the goal but was defended by a BGSU player who appeared to be standing inside the goal when he knocked the ball away. “I looked over at the linesman and he was just standing there,” Killian said. “It looked like it was a goal to me, but maybe he saw something I didn’t. At the end of the day, it is what it is.” Bluem said he hasn’t seen the video yet, but it looked like a goal to him as well. “We thought we had two goals in the first half,” Bluem said. “Didn’t get either one of them. But the guys at least kept after it.” The Falcons had two big scoring opportunities, but were turned away each time by a Lampson punch at the ball that sent it over the crossbar. “I think we did phenomenal,” Killian said. “We stayed tight, Lampson did a very good job back there communicating with us and overall it was just a good performance.” Wahl said the team is looking forward and hopes to keep the victories coming for OSU. “We needed to keep things going in the right direction, keep the wins going,” Wahl said. “So you can have a shot at that ring.” Bluem said he was impressed by the Falcons’ performance and that his squad beat a quality team. “Bowling Green is a good team, and the record that they have is no fluke,” he said. “They’ve got some good players and they’re very well organized and disciplined.” The Buckeyes will look to remain unbeaten in conference play as they face Northwestern (4-4-3) Sunday, Oct. 9, at 2 p.m. at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. read more

Robinson takes advantage of Sullingers absence in Kansas win

LAWRENCE, Kan. — Ohio State men’s basketball sophomore forward Jared Sullinger was absent from the Buckeyes’ lineup for the second consecutive game, and Kansas junior forward Thomas Robinson took full advantage.  In Sullinger’s absence and with no dominant presence to deny him, Robinson tied for a game-high 21 points to help No. 13 Kansas (7-2) beat No. 2 OSU (8-1), 78-67. Robinson said he knew the anticipated matchup between he and Sullinger was off the first time he ran on the floor and saw the OSU sophomore wearing street clothes. “I was excited to go against (Sullinger),” Robinson said. “It comes down to is Kansas versus Ohio State. It’s not Thomas Robinson versus Jared Sullinger. I know it would have been fun for everybody to watch, but it comes down to my team versus their team.”  Sullinger suffered back spasms during the team’s Nov. 29 win against Duke and missed last Saturday’s 64-35 win against Texas-Pan American, allowing Robinson to contribute during Kansas’ 9-2 run to open the game and light the fuse of a rowdy Allen Fieldhouse crowd. Robinson scored seven points in the first half. “It’s a tremendous chance (without Sullinger) because he’s the best big man in the country,” OSU senior guard WIlliam Buford said. “When you’re missing out on that, you’re going to have difficulties and have to make some adjustments.”  Saturday marked the first time that Sullinger missed consecutive games in his OSU career. Kansas went on a 9-2 run to extend its lead to 23-13 with fewer than eight minutes to play. Back-to-back 3-pointers by OSU sophomore forward Deshaun Thomas and a rim-rattling dunk by freshman center Amir Williams silenced the raucous Jayhawks supporters as the Buckeyes climbed to be within five points at 26-21. Thomas helped OSU stay in the game, eventually scoring 15 first-half points on 5-of-8 shooting. As is customary when Kansas is playing well at Allen Fieldhouse, the silence was short lived. A dunk by Kansas junior forward Kevin Young brought the few fans were seated to their feet, with just more than four minutes to play and restored the Jayhawks’ 10-point lead. Kansas eventually took a 35-29 lead into half. The Jayhawks’ 35 points were the most allowed by the Buckeyes in the opening period since VMI scored 44 in the first half of a Nov. 23 game. New Kansas football coach and four-time Super Bowl champion Charlie Weis was introduced at halftime and addressed the crowd saying, “Let’s whoop Ohio State’s.” Led by Robinson, the whooping would follow in the half to come. Kansas opened the second half by hitting four 3-pointers with junior guard Elijah Johnson hitting three of them. A one-handed dunk by Robinson helped give the Jayhawks a 52-44 midway through the period. Buford scored just four points and was just 1-of-7 shooting in the first half, but had accumulated 14 points with under nine minutes remaining to help to Buckeyes remain competitive. Buford finished the game with 21 points, three assists and five rebounds. Matta’s team trailed, 59-48, with 8:44 to play when Robinson was called for a technical foul. Buford hit the resulting free-throws before sophomore guard Jordan Sibert stole the ball and added two points to cut the deficit to seven with 8:08 to play. The Buckeyes had the Jayhawks lead down to six points with 1:24 to play and would not go away. Robinson hauled in two rebounds off missed OSU shots with under a minute to play, the second of which came with the shot clock unplugged. Williams attempted to foul Robinson, but was called for an intentional foul. Robinson made the ensuing free-throws to ice the game. “I had some up-and-down moments in the game as far as dealing with frustration,” Robinson said. “My teammates just kept talking to me and telling me to finish the game and that’s what happened.”  Robinson was subbed from the game with 11.8 seconds to play and the victory secured, and received a standing ovation. The celebration went into full-force seconds later when the clock bled out and Kansas won by the same score. OSU will return home for a Wednesday game against South Carolina-Upstate at the Schottenstein Center. Opening tip is set for 7:30 p.m. read more

Gallery Mens Volleyball vs George Mason

The Ohio State Men’s Volleyball team took on George Mason University on Jan. 18 at St. John Arena.  Ohio State lost 1-3. Photos by Ethan Clewell. Ohio State sophomore Kyle Skinner (22) gets ready to spike the ball at the game against George Mason on Jan. 18. at St. John Arena in Columbus. Photo Credit: Ethan Clewell | Senior Reporter

Clever cat uses zebra crossing in Kent

first_imgMr Scrutton captures the hilarious moment on his dashcam A chauffeur has captured the adorable moment drivers stopped to let a clever cat use a pedestrian crossing in Dartford.Not content with risking any of its nine lives, the feline was filmed carefully waiting for cars to slow down before crossing St Vincent’s Road on Sunday afternoon. Mr Scrutton captures the hilarious moment on his dashcamCredit:SWNS Justin Scrutton, from Stone, caught the footage on his dashboard camera after taking his car to the valet.The 44-year-old said as he slowed down to approach the pedestrian crossing he spotted the black and white cat waiting to cross. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more